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Full text of "Annual report of the Metropolitan District Commission"

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Public Document 



No. 48 







West Commontoealtf) of Q&asmttmmts 



ANNUAL BEPORT 



OF THE 



Metropolitan District Commission 



For the Year 1927 





y 



Publication of this Document approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 



1 M-5-'28. No. 2336 



;*f the Comroonwi 

CONTENTS 

I. Organization and Administration 

Commission, Officers and Employees 
II. General Financial Statement 

III. Construction 

IV. Parks and Reservations 
V. Rainfall and Consumption of Water 

VI. Special Investigations . 
VII. Other Reports ~ . . . 

Report of the Director and Chief Engineer of Park Engineering 

Data relating to Metropolitan Park System 
Report of the Director and Chief Engineer of Water Division . 

Organization 

Metropolitan Water District and Works 

Construction 

Improvement of Service in Watertown 
Southern High Service Pipe Lines 
Meters and Connections 
Chlorinating Apparatus 
Improvement of Wachusett Watershed 
Proposed Extensions of the Works 

Maintenance 

Precipitation and Yield of Watersheds 
Storage Reservoirs .... 
Wachusett Reservoir 
Sudburv Reservoir .... 
Framingham Reservoir No. 3 . 
Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2, Ashland, Hopkinton and 

Whitehall Reservoirs and Farm Pond 
Lake Cochituate 
Aqueducts .... 
Protection of Water Supply 
Clinton Sewage Disposal 

Forestry 

Hydroelectric Service . 
Distribution Pumping Stations 
Distribution Reservoirs 
Consumption of Water 
Water from Metropolitan Water Works Sources used outside of the 
Metropolitan Water District 
Report of Director and Chief Engineer of Sewerage Division 
Organization .... 
Metropolitan Sewerage Districts 

Areas and Populations . 
Metropolitan Sewers 

Sewers purchased and constructed and their Connections 

Construction 

North Metropolitan Sewerage System 
Mill Brook Valley Sewer — Arlington 
Belmont Relief Sewer — Section 81 
Maiden, Revere and Everett Drainage System 
New Mystic Valley Sewer 

Maintenance 

Scope of Work and Force employed 
East Boston Pumping Station 
Deer Island Pumping Station 
Charlestown Pumping Station . 
Alewife Brook Pumping Station . 



PAGE 

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11 



P.D. 48 



v vage to — 



Table No. 
Table No. 



Nut Island Screen-house 

Gasolene in Public Sewers 

Data relating to Areas and Populations contributing Se 

Metropolitan Sewerage System .... 

North Metropolitan System .... 

South Metropolitan System .... 

Whole Metropolitan System .... 

Pumping Stations 

Capacities and Results 

North Metropolitan System .... 
South Metropolitan System .... 

Metropolitan Sewerage Outfalls 

Material intercepted at the Screens .... 

Financial Statement 

Parks Division 

Sewerage Division 

Water Division 

Appendix No. 1. — Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Parks Division 

made and pending during the year 1927 
Appendix No. 2. — Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Water Works 

made and pending during the year 1927 
Appendix No. 3. — Tables relating to the Maintenance of the Metropoli 

tan Water Works 

Table No. 1. — Monthly Rainfall in Inches at Various Places on the 

Metropolitan Water Works in 1927 

— Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 1927 

— Wachusett System — Statistics of Flow of Water 
Storage and Rainfall in 1927 

Table No. 4. — Sudbury System — Statistics of Flow of Water 

Storage and Rainfall in 1927 

Table No. 5. — Cochituate System — Statistics of Flow of Water 

Storage and Rainfall in 1927 

Table No. 6. — Sources from which and Periods during which Water 

has been drawn for the Supply of the Metropolitan 

Water District 

Table No. 7. — Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through 

Aqueducts in 1927 by Months 

Table No. 8. — (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water 

by Districts in the Cities and Towns supplied by the 
Metropolitan Water Works in 1927 .... 

Table No. 9. — (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water in* 

Cities and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan 
Water Works in 1927 .... . . 

Table No. 10. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Wachusett 

Reservoir, Clinton 

Table No. 11. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Sudbury 

Reservoir 

Table No. 12. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Spot Pond, 

Stoneham ... 

Table No. 13. - - Chemical Examinations of Water from Lake Chochit- 

uate 

Chemical Examinations of Water from a Tap at the 

State House, Boston .... . 

Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in 

Boston, 1898-1927 

Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimeter in Water 
from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water 
Works, 1898-1927 



Table No. 14. 
Table No. 15. 
Table No. 16. 



PAGE 

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P.D. 48 iii 

PAGE 

Table No. 17. — Colors of Water from Various Parts of the Metro- 
politan Water Works in 1927 91 

Table No. 18. — Temperatures of Water from Various Parts of the 

Metropolitan Water Works in 1927 ... 92 

Table No. 19. — Length of Metropolitan Water Works Main Lines and 

Connections and Number of Valves set in Same, 
Dec. 31, 1927 93 

Table No. 20. — Length of Metropolitan Water Works Hydrant, Blow-off 

and Drain Pipes, Dec. 31, 1927 94 

Table No. 21. — Length of Metropolitan Water Works Main Lines and 

Connections and Water Pipes, Four Inches in 
Diameter and Larger, in the Several Cities and 
Towns in the Metropolitan Water District, Dec 
31, 1927 . . 95 

Table No. 22. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters, Per Cent of Serv- 
ices Metered, Fire Services and Fire Hydrants in 
the Several Cities and Towns in the Metropolitan 
Water District, December 31, 1927 . . . .96 

Table No. 23. — Elevation of the Hydraulic Grade Line, in Feet, above 

Boston City Base for Each Month at Stations on 
Metropolitan Water Works during 1927 ... 97 
Appendix No. 4. — Contracts made and pending during the year 1926 — 

Sewerage Division 100 



REPORT OF THE METROPOLITAN DISTRICT 

COMMISSION 

To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts in General Court assembled. 

The Metropolitan District Commissioner has already presented to your Hon- 
orable Body an abstract of the account of the receipts, expenditures, disbursements 
and liabilities of the Metropolitan District Commission for the fiscal year ending 
on November 30, 1927, and now, in accordance with the provisions of section 100 of 
chapter 92 of the General Laws, presents a detailed statement of its doings for 
the calendar year ending on December 31, 1927. 

EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 
I. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 

Commission, Officers and Employees 

The term of office of Frank G. Hall expired on November 30, 1927, but as yet 
no appointment has been made. The membership of the Commission has con- 
sequently remained as in the preceding year: Davis B. Keniston, Commissioner; 
Frank A. Bayrd, Frank G. Hall, William H. Squire and George B. Wason, Associate 
Commissioners. John R. Rablin is Director of Park Engineering, William E. Foss, 
Director of the Water Division and Frederick D. Smith, Director of the Sewerage 
Division. 

George Lyman Rogers has continued as secretary, William E. Whittaker was 
during the year appointed assistant secretary, and the following have continued 
as chief engineers: of parks, John R. Rablin; of water, William E. Foss; of sewer- 
age, Frederick D. Smith. 

The maximum number of employees during the year was 1,601, divided as fol- 
lows: general offices, 29; parks, 959; water, 397; sewerage, 216. 

In this tabulation of employees the police are included under parks, although they 
give considerable protection to portions of the water system. . 

II. GENERAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Year ending November 80, 1927 



Expended for construction 

Expenditures, miscellaneous 

Expenditures for maintenance 

Total expenditure . 

Unexpended balance, maintenance appropriations 

Serial bonds and notes issued 

Serial bonds and notes paid . 

Increase in sinking funds 

Decrease in net debt 



$1,963, 
207, 
3,727, 
5,898, 
1,183, 
2,602, 
1,619, 
2,316, 
1,334, 



535 68 
143 96 
714 97 
394 61 
483 54 
163 08 
731 46 
772 38 
340 76 



Net debt 



On November 30, 1927 



$38,702,750 23 



III. CONSTRUCTION 

The fourth and last section of the Mill Brook Valley sewer in Arlington was 
completed early in the year and the entire sewer is now in operation. 

The work on Belmont relief sewer extension from the Belmont town line to the 
Alewife Brook Valley sewer was commenced March 11 and was completed Novem- 
ber 15 and the line put in operation. 

No work upon the Maiden, Revere and Everett drainage channel has been carried 
on during the year as the temporary injunction issued by the Supreme Court has 
not been dissolved. 



2 P.D. 48 

Plans for the new Mystic Valley main sewer authorized by Chapter 184 of the 
Acts of 1927 have been completed and contract plans are about completed. 

Two new horizontal boilers have been installed at the Deer Island pumping station 
and the coal run from the wharf to the shore has been rebuilt. Two boilers and 
the economizer at the Charlestown pumping station have been replaced. A new 
pumping unit and feed water heater at the Alewife Brook pumping station have 
been installed and one boiler has been re tubed. 

Work on the Watertown Branch of the Weston Aqueduct supply mains has 
been completed. Construction of the southern high-service pipe line from Chestnut 
Hill pumping station to the Arborway at Jamaica Pond was started in May, and the 
line has been completed except for a section 300 feet in length, and for considerable 
refilling and resurfacing. 

Chlorinating apparatus at Chestnut Hill Reservoir for the Lake Cochituate 
supply has been installed. A contract has been awarded for a new three-million 
gallon pumping engine for the Arlington station. Surveys have been completed 
for the proposed northern high-service pipe line from Main Street, Maiden to 
Broadway, Revere, and considerable work has been done upon the surveys for the 
proposed Weston Aqueduct supply main from Weston through Newton and 
Brighton to connect with the 48-inch low-service lines from Chestnut Hill pump- 
ing station to Spot Pond. 

The John W. Weeks foot bridge was completed early in the year and was for- 
mally dedicated in May. The construction of the Cottage Farm bridge has been 
in progress and the Cambridge arch and main span and the piers and steel work 
for the railroad bridge have been completed, but the date of completion of the 
bridge has been substantially delayed by the change in plans for the steel work 
for the railroad bridge, to comply with the requirements of the Boston & Albany 
Railroad. 

Pope's Hill bridge for the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad over 
the Old Colony Parkway, with this link of the parkway, has been completed and 
opened to travel. 

Work upon the Dorchester Bay bridge was started in July and will be com- 
pleted during the year. 

The remaining section of the Northern Traffic Artery along Bridge Street from 
Lechmere Square to Commercial Street and the new roadway between Lechmere 
Canal and Broad Canal have been completed. 

The surfacing, grading and planting along Soldier's Field road between Western 
Avenue and North Harvard Street has been finished. 

The proposed Charles River Road on the Boston side of the Charles River 
from Chilmark Street to the new Cottage Farm bridge has been graded. 

Memorial Drive from Western Avenue to Boylston Street has been resurfaced. 

Wales Street bridge between Newton and Wellesley, authorized by Chapter 
283 of the Acts of 1927, was started and has been completed except the surfacing 
of the roadway on the approaches and bridge. 

About 3.2 miles of roadway in Stony Brook Reservation have been recon- 
structed and resurfaced. 

Blue Hill river road in the Blue Hills Reservation from Hillside Street, Milton, 
to West Street, Braintree, has been subgraded for a substantial distance. 

One hundred and fifty electric lamps with underground cable have been in- 
stalled in Middlesex Fells Reservation and Charles River Reservation and 175 
higher power lamps have replaced the smaller lamps on Memorial Drive. A 
skating pond in Blue Hills Reservation at West Quincy has been built; a new 
water main at Revere Beach installed; parking spaces at Nahant provided; and 
Maiden Border Road, Fellsway East and a portion of the road through Blue Hills 
Reservation east of Randolph Avenue reconstructed. 

IV. PARKS AND RESERVATIONS 

The usual work of maintenance and upkeep of the parks, reservations and 
boulevards has been continued during the year. The public has made use of the 
metropolitan areas and roadways much the same as in preceding years. Auto- 



P.D. 48 3 

mobile travel on the parkways and boulevards is heavier each year. The unusually 
cool and wet summer resulted in a decreased patronage of the public bath houses 
and there seems to be a growing tendency for bathers to dress at home and drive 
to and from the bathing resorts without using the public bath houses. The dress- 
ing facilities in the public bath houses are, however, still too small on hot summer 
holidays to accommodate all those who would use them. 

The police force was increased during the year by the addition of ten perma- 
nent officers, but the temporary summer force was decreased from forty to twenty 
and the period of service cut from five to three months. These changes were made 
to allow a schedule of vacation periods for the permanent force throughout the 
year and has resulted in a more efficient summer force and in a net saving in pay- 
rolls. The force at the end of the year consisted of 1 Captain and Executive 
Officer, 5 captains, 5 lieutenants, 18 sergeants, 148 patrolmen and 1 police woman. 
During the year two officers have died, two have been discharged and twelve 
permanent new patrolmen have been added to the force. During the year 4,702 
complaints and arrests were made, an increase over the preceding year, resulting in 
4,234 convictions for which a total of $34,308 in fines and 32 years in sentences 
were imposed. 

The remaining life beneficiary under the Henry L. Pierce devise died within 
the year and this portion of that estate, consisting of about 155 acres adjoining 
the Blue Hills Reservation in Ponkapoag has now become available for public use. 

The use of the Police Boat " Protector" of the Department of Public Safety 
was discontinued for ice breaking in the Charles River Basin for the winter season 
of 1927-8, and a private boat has been hired in its place. 

During the summer months 120 band concerts were given in the various parks 
and reservations at a cost of $18,842.80. 

V. RAINFALL AND CONSUMPTION OF WATER 

The precipitation and yield of the watersheds was much below normal during 
the first six months and far above normal* during the last six months of the year. 
The total precipitation for the year was over 9 inches above normal for the Wa- 
chusett watershed. The Wachusett Reservoir was drawn down on January 14 
to elevation 362.76, or 32.24 feet below high-water line, the lowest level since 
the reservoir first filled in 1908. The water rose to elevation 372.20, the highest 
point during the spring, the lowest spring filling since the reservoir first filled, or 
11.05 feet lower than the maximum point of filling for 1926. The reservoir was 
drawn down to elevation 364.63 by July 30, since which date, due to the unusual 
rainfall, it has gradually filled and was at the end of the year at elevation 385.44, 
or 9.56 feet below high-water line. 

The unusual rainfall during the last five months of the year has temporarily 
relieved the danger of a water shortage. During the last seven months of the year 
about 15 million gallons a day has been drawn from Lake Cochituate. The pipe 
lines and connections from the southern Sudbury reservoirs into the Sudbury 
Aqueduct and Reservoir have been completed by the Metropolitan District Water 
Supply Commission and these emergencj 7 " supplies can be used if required. 

During the year 48,358,569,000 gallons of water were furnished to the 18 cities 
and towns supplied, equivalent to a daily average consumption of 132,489,200 
gallons, and for the estimated population of 1,344,560 at the rate of 98.5 gallons 
per capita, a little in excess of the rate in 1926. 

VI. SPECIAL INVESTIGATIONS 

In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 8 of the Resolves of 1927 the 
Commission investigated and reported as to the desirability, feasibility and cost 
to the cities and towns comprising the Metropolitan Parks District, of the con- 
trol and maintenance of certain bridges and their approaches. The report is 
printed as House Document 2 of 1928. 

In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 15 of the Resolves of 1927 the 
Commission investigated and reported on the advisability, expediency and cost 



4 P.D. 48 

of constructing and maintaining overpasses or underpasses to carry traffic on 
Revere Beach Parkway across Main Street and Broadway in the City of Everett 
and Broadway in the City of Revere. The report is printed as House Document 3 
of 1928. 

In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 31 of the Resolves of 1927 the 
Commission investigated and reported on the advisability of changing the terms 
and conditions for admission to the Metropolitan Water District of any munici- 
pality, any part of which is within ten miles of the State House; also as to the 
advisability of enlarging the Metropolitan Water District, or of allowing certain 
municipalities to take water from the metropolitan supply, together with terms 
and conditions. The report is printed as House Document 74 of 1928. 

In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 32 of the Resolves of 1927, the 
Commissioner of Mental Diseases, the Commissioner of the Metropolitan District 
Commission and the Commissioner of Public Health investigated, considered and 
reported upon the best practicable plan for the disposal of the sewage of the pro- 
posed state hospital to be located on land in Waltham, Belmont and Lexington. 
The report is printed as House Document 261 of 1928. 

In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 42 of the Resolves of 1927 the 
Metropolitan District Commission and the Department of Public Health, acting 
jointly, considered and reported on the advisability of using water from the Charles 
River Basin for fire protection and sale for manufacturing purposes in the cities 
and towns adjacent to the basin and on the probable effect of such taking of water 
upon the use of the basin and its shores for the purposes designed and upon the 
sanitary condition of the shores and waters of the basin. The report is printed as 
House Document 73 of 1928. 

VII. OTHER REPORTS 

The reports of the Directors of Park Engineering, Water and Sewerage, with 
tables, statistics and financial statements, are hereby appended. 

Respectfully submitted, 

DAVIS B. KENISTON, 

February 29, 1928. Metropolitan District Commissioner. 

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR AND CHIEF 
ENGINEER OF PARK ENGINEERING 

Hon. Davis B. Keniston, Commissioner, Metropolitan District Commission. 

Dear Sir: — I submit the following report of the work done under the direc- 
tion and supervision of the Engineering Department of the Parks Division, during 
the year ending November 30, 1927. 

Of the contracts let during 1926 on which the work had been in progress during 
the year, eight were not completed until the early part of this year, as follows: 

Bridge for New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad over Old Colonv Parkway, 

May 31, 1927. 
Northern Traffic Arterjr, Bridge over Boston & Maine Railroad, June 14, 1927. 
Gtading and surfacing Northern Traffic Artery (two contracts) June 28, 1927. 
River walls on Charles River Basin northerly of Broad Canal, March 16, 1927. 
Grading near Cottage Farm Bridge approaches, Februarj^ 5, 1927. 
Grading and surfacing extension of Soldier's Field Road from North Harvard 

Street to Western Avenue, May 5, 1927. 
John W. Weeks Bridge over Charles River Basin, April 30, 1927. 

The work of building the Cottage Farm Bridge, contract for which was made 
in September, 1926, has been in progress since that time. On account of delays 
in obtaining steel for the railroad bridge, due to changes in design and other 
causes, the work will probably not be completed by the end of this year as had been 
expected and will require until next June or July. 



P.D. 48 5 

During this year plans and specifications have been prepared and contracts 
let for work amounting to about $1,100,000, which includes the following: 

Dorchester Bay Bridge for Old Colony Parkwaj'. 

Northern Traffic Artery, between Lechmere and Broad Canals. 

Surfacing Memorial Drive, Cambridge Parkway, Boylston Street to Western 

Avenue. 
Wales Street Bridge between Newton and Wellesley. 
Reconstruction and resurfacing roadways in Stony Brook Reservation. 
Construction of Blue Hill River Road through the southerly section of Blue Hills 

Reservation from Hillside Street, Milton, to West Street, Braintree. 

Several minor contracts have been let and considerable work done by the forces 
of the various divisions of the department. This work includes the installation of 
electric lighting system for 150 lamps with underground cable in Middlesex Fells 
Division and Charles River Reservation, and changing the electric lighting sys- 
tem of Memorial Drive, Cambridge Parkway, by installing 175 higher power 
lamps in place of the present small units; repairs to sea walls and additional 
shore protection at Revere Beach Reservation, Winthrop Shore Reservation and 
Lynn Shore Reservation; skating pond in Blue Hills Reservation at West Quincy; 
granolithic walks at Lynn Shore Reservation, Revere Beach Reservation and 
Middlesex Fells Parkway; new water main in Revere Beach Reservation; parking 
spaces at Nahant Beach Parkway; reconstruction of Maiden Border Road, Fells- 
way East; and reconstruction of portion of road through Blue Hills Reservation, 
east of Randolph Avenue. 

Surveys and plans have been made for Lynn Fells Parkway Extension to New- 
buryport Turnpike; acquirement of land along the Charles River in Dedham 
near Spring Street Bridge; acquirement of land for extension of West Roxbury 
Parkway along Newton Street to Hammond Street, Brookline; andStoneham- 
Wakefield Parkway. Also plans for the construction of Furnace Brook Parkway 
Extension from Black's Creek to Sea Street, Quincy, and for Sanitary Buildings 
at Nantasket and Revere Beach Reservations. 

The direction and supervision of all maintenance operations in the various 
divisions have been assigned by the Commission to the Engineering Division. 
An additional assistant was appointed in June to give special attention to this 
branch of the work and to study and investigate the organization and methods 
in use in each Division with a view to standardization and consolidation where 
possible. 

The Engineering force, although varying somewhat during the year, has averaged 
as follows: one Chief Engineer; one Associate Civil Engineer; one Senior Civil 
Engineer; seven Assistant Civil Engineers; ten Junior Civil Engineers; thirteen 
Senior Engineering Aids; nineteen Junior Engineering Aids; two Bridge Inspectors; 
four Clerks and Stenographers; one Garage Foreman; one Chauffeur; one Super- 
visor of Machinery; one Supervisor of Park Maintenance and one Superin- 
tendent of Bridges; forty-five Lock and Drawbridge Assistants. 

All work of maintenance and repairs to bridges and locks and operation of 
drawbridges and locks has been done under the direction and supervision of this 
Division. 

The work of painting and repairing the lock gates at Charles River Dam was 
done between February 8 and March 3, 1927. This work necessitated the closing 
of the lock to traffic for two periods, from February 8 to 19, and from February 
25 to March 3. 

The work of breaking ice in the channels of the Charles. River Basin and in 
Broad and Lechmere Canals for the season of 1926 and 1927, was done by the 
police boat owned by the Commonwealth and under the control of the Department 
of Public Safety. The total cost was $8,899.75. 



6 



P.D. 48 



The following is a record of the traffic through locks and drawbridges during the 
year: 

Charles River Dam and Locks 



Number of openings, 4,763 
Number of vessels, 6,864 
Number of boats, 2,517 
Lumber (feet B. M.), 2,074,000 
Coal (tons), 273,223 
Oil (bbls.), 623,500 



Piling (lineal feet), 82 
Sand (tons), 406,790 
Gravel (tons), 180,854 
Rubble stone (tons), 36,525 
Granite (tons), 3,240 
Miscellaneous (tons), 1,130 



Empty barrels, 42,453 

There were 3,325 drawbridge openings. 



Number of openings, 144 
Number of boats, 183 



Number of openings, 346 
Number of vessels, 497 
Coal (tons), 40,717 



Cradock Bridge Lock 

Number of boats over roll way, 152 

Neponset Bridge 

Lumber (feet B. M.), 1,779,000 
Sand (tons), 2,200 



Maiden River Bridge 
Number of openings, 421 | Number of vessels, 780 



Saugus River Bridge 
Number of openings, 771 Number of vessels, 1,080 



Number of openings, 162 



Wellington Bridge 

Number of vessels, 218 



The Engineering Division has furnished supervision and inspection of work 
done by cities, towns, public service corporations and individuals to whom permits 
are issued to do work within the areas controlled by the Commission. 

Surveys and staking of boundary and restriction lines where building operations 
are in progress and testing for encroachments have required considerable attention. 



The cost of conducting the Division has been as follows: 



Engineering: 
Construction: 
Services 
Expenses 

Maintenance : 
Services 
Expenses 



$85,180 92 
3,705 80 



$42,032 86 
4,045 05 



$88,886 72 



46,077 91 

Total $134,962 63 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN R. RABLIN, 

Chief Engineer and Director of Park Engineering. 
Boston, December 2, 1927. 



P.D. 48 7 

Table I. — Data relating to Metropolitan Park System Areas of Reser- 
vations and Parkways 

Reservations : Acres 

Blue Hills 4,906.43 

Bunker Hill 6.05 

Middlesex Fells 2,151.49 

Stony Brook 463.72 

Beaver Brook 58.33 

Hart's Hill 22.97 

Hemlock Gorge 23.06 

Charles River 884.78 

Mystic River 54.18 

Neponset River 921.56 

King's Beach and Lynn Shore 22 . 69 

Revere Beach . 64 . 29 

Winthrop Shore 16.83 

Quincy Shore 32.91 

Nantasket Beach 25 . 59 



Total 



9,654.88 



Parkways: 
Hammond Pond 
Blue Hills 
Old Colony 
Woburn 
Middlesex Fells 
Revere Beach 
Mystic Valley 
Neponset River 
Fresh Pond 
Lynn Fells 
Furnace Brook 
Nahant Beach 
Lynnway . 
Winthrop . 
Dedham . 
Alewife Brook 
West Roxbury 
Quannapowitt 

Total 



Grand total, reservations and parkways 



183 . 69 
83.58 
53.47 
23.24 
82.12 

126.73 

337 . 89 
73.92 
12.40 
29.98 

101.14 

81.98 

5.15 

8.74 

37.14 

144.88 
85.64 
15.54 



1,487.23 
11,142.11 



Lengths of Formal Roads Constructed 

Double Single 
Roadways Roadways 



Reservations : 


Miles 


Miles 


Charles River 


— 


6.21 


Lynn Shore 


— 


1.12 


Quincy Shore 


— 


2.24 


Revere Beach 


— 


2.70 


Stony Brook 


— 


3.25 


Winthrop Shore .... 


— 


1.07 



16.59 



8 



P.D. 48 



















Double 


Single 




Roadways 


Roadways 




Parkways: • Miles 


Miles 




Alewife Brook . 


.70 




Blue Hills . 
















. 1.46 


1.61 




Cambridge 1 
















.37 


3.19 




Dedham 
















— 


.89 




Fresh Pond 
















— 


.50 




Furnace Brook 
















— 


4.32 




Lynn Fells 
















— 


1.05 




Lynnway 
















— 


.68 




Middlesex Fells 
















4.10 


1.77 




Mystic Valley . 
















— 


6.17 




Nahant Beach . 
















— 


.50 




Neponset River 
















— 


.76 




Old Colony 
















— 


1.71 




Revere Beach . 
















1.45 


3.73 




West Roxbury . 
















i 


2.85 




Winthrop . 
















— 


1.09 




Woburn 
















— 


1.38 




h 


7.38* 


32.90 


32.90 


* Equivalent in miles of single roadway 


• 


14.76 


Highways transferred by or taken from cities and towns : 


Miles 




Alewife Brook Parkway . 


.44 




Blue Hills Reservation . 












1.23 




Charles River Reservation 












.39 




Middlesex Fells Reservation . 












6.63 




Nantasket Beach Reservation 












.71 








9.40 


Lengths of automobile roads in reservations: 




Blue Hills 


5.35 




Charles River 


2.80 




Middlesex Fells 


4.06 


12.21 






Grand total 


85.86 



All above roads open to automobile traffic. 



Length of Carriage Roads and Bridle Paths in Reservations 

Miles 

Blue Hills Reservation 27.08 

Middlesex Fells Reservation 14 . 55 

Stony Brook Reservation 1 . 60 

Beaver Brook Reservation .22 

Charles River Reservation .89 

Total 44.34 

Lights in Parkway and Reservations 

Lights 

Alewife Brook Parkway (arc lights) 10 

Blue Hills Parkway (Welsbach gas) 80 

Charles River Reservation, Upper Division, Soldier's Field Road, Ar- 
senal Road and North Beacon Street, Arsenal Street Bridge (electric) 20 

1 Area included in Charles River Reservation. 



P.D. 48 



9 















Lights 


Charles River Reservation, Boston Embankment (electric) . 106 


Cambridge Parkway (electric) 






202 


Charles River Reservation, Lower Basin, Dam and Lock (arc 







16 


Harvard Bridge (electric) 






30 


Western Avenue Bridge (electric) 












14 


Temporary Cottage Farm Bridge (electric) 












10 


Fresh Pond Parkway (electric) 












15 


Furnace Brook Parkway (Welsbach gas) 












79 


Furnace Brook Parkway (electric) 












2 


Lynn Fells Parkway (Welsbach naptha) 












17 


Lynn Shore Reservation (electric) 












30 


Lynnway (electric) 








• / 




10 


Middlesex Fells Parkway (Welsbach naptha) 












60 


Middlesex Fells Parkway (electric) 












181 


Middlesex Fells Reservation (Welsbach naptha) 












24 


Middlesex Fells Reservation (electric) 












54 


Mystic Valley Parkway (Welsbach naptha) 












60 


Mystic Valley Parkway (electric) 












1 


Nahant Beach Parkway (electric) 












7 1 


Nantasket Beach Reservation (electric) 












29 2 


Old Colony Parkway (electric) 












46 


Quincy Shore Reservation (Welsbach gas) . 












78 


Revere Beach Parkway (electric) . 












181 


Revere Beach Reservation (electric) . 












119 3 


Winthrop Parkway (Welsbach naptha) 












6 


Winthrop Parkway (electric) .... 












19 


Winthrop Shore Reservation (electric) 












7 


x ocai ............. 


1,513 


Miles of Seashore 


Miles 


Lynn Shore 1 . 50 


Nahant Beach 












3.92 


Revere Beach 












2.74 


Winthrop Shore 












1.71 


Nantasket Beach 












1.02 


Quincy Shore 












2.19 


JL Lt.il ...••••••.••• 


13.08 


Lengths of Sea Walls 


Miles 


Lynn Shore 1 . 30 


Revere Beach at Northern Circle 


.08 


Revere Beach at Eliot Circle 


.15 


Revere Beach, shore protection, bath house shelter and Revere Street 




shelter 


.29 


Revere Beach, shore protection, south of Northern Circle 


.28 


Winthrop Shore, bridge to Great Head 


1.04 


Winthrop Shore, bridge to Grover's Cliff 


.23 


Quincy Shore Reservation, shore protection, south of Webster Street . 


1.08 


Quincy Shore Reservation, southerly end .15 



1 Five additional lights, June 1 to December 1. 

2 Five additional lights in summer. 

3 Thirty-three electric all night, May 1 to October 31. Thirty-three electric to midnight, June 1 to 
September 30. Six all night, May 1 to September 30. 



10 



P.D. 48 



Nantasket Beach Reservation 

Winthrop Parkway, near Leverett Avenue, Revere and Winthrop Broad 
Sound Avenue to Sewall Avenue 

Total 



Charles River . 
Mystic River . 
Neponset River 
Alewife Brook . 



Miles of River Bank 



Total 



Bridges 



Reinforced concrete bridges 
Steel bridges 
Wooden bridges 
Drawbridges 
Footbridges 



Total 

Culverts 
Reinforced concrete and other masonry culverts 

Dams 



Beaver Brook Reservation, small wooden dams 

Blue Hills Reservation, small wooden dam . ...... 

Charles River Reservation, wooden dam at Watertown, 220 feet in 

length 

Charles River Reservation, Charles River Basin tidal dam, 1,200 feet 

in length 

Charles River Reservation, small stone dam in branch below Washing- 
ton Street, Newton Lower Falls 

Charles River Reservation, reinforced concrete dam at Washington 

Street, Newton Lower Falls, 175 feet in length 

Furnace Brook Parkway, reinforced concrete dam upstream from 

Black's Creek Bridge 

Hemlock Gorge Reservation, small stone masonry dam with stop 

planks, in gorge 

Hemlock Gorge Reservation, small reinforced concrete dam on East 

Branch of river, Newton Upper Falls 

Hemlock Gorge Reservation, reinforced concrete dam in Charles River 

at Boylston Street, Newton Upper Falls, 90 feet in length . 
Mystic River Reservation, reinforced concrete tidal dam at Cradock 

Bridge, 100 feet in length; weirs 400 feet in length .... 

Total 



Miles 
.54 

.52 



5.66 

Miles 
33.34 

8.16 
15.86 

4.50 

61.86 



17 
12 

8 1 

6 
12 

55 



42 



12 



Lock Gates, Sluice Gates and Tide Gates 

Charles River Reservation, Charles River Basin tidal dam, 6 lock gates, 13 sluice 

gates, 43 tide gates. 
Mystic River Reservation, Cradock Bridge tidal dam, 2 lock gates, 4 sluice gates, 

8 tide gates. 
Quincy Shore Reservation, 8 tide gates. 
Revere Beach Parkway, 1 tide gate. 



1 One-half of Wellington bridge rebuilt with concrete girders. 



P.D. 48 



11 



Police Signal System 



Miles 
SIV2 

10 



Blue Hills Division .... 
Middlesex Fells Division 
Nantasket Beach Division 
Charles River Reservation 
Fresh Pond Parkway 

Total 62^ 

Revere Beach Division police signal system, serving 11 miles of parkways and 
reservations, and Middlesex Fells Division, serving 1}4 miles of parkway, on wires 
leased from the New England Telephone and Telegraph Company. 

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR AND CHIEF 
ENGINEER OF WATER DIVISION 

Davis B. Keniston, Commissioner, Metropolitan District Commission. 

Sir : — I respectfully submit the following report of the construction and main- 
tenance operations of the Water Division for the calendar year 1927. 

ORGANIZATION 

The number of supervising, clerical and engineering employees was 53. A 
labor force including 290 employees at the beginning and 289 at the end of the 
year was engaged in maintaining and operating the reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe 
lines, hydroelectric and pumping stations and in doing miscellaneous construction 
work. The average number of employees of all classes for the entire year was 366. 

METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT AND WORKS 

The Water District now includes 20 municipalities with an area of about 174 
square miles and population as of July 1, 1927, of 1,445,110. The Water Works 
lands include an area of about 19,000 acres, of which about 2,000 acres have been 
planted with pine trees. The works include 9 storage reservoirs with 200 square 
miles of tributary watershed, a total storage capacity of 80 billion gallons and 
water surface of 8,600 acres; 60 miles of aqueducts; 2 hydroelectric power sta- 
tions of a capacity of 7,000 horse power; 16 miles of high-tension power trans- 
mission line; 5 distribution pumping stations with a combined equipment of 
6,560 horse power and pumping capacity of 280 million gallons a day; 12 dis- 
tribution reservoirs with a capacity of 234 billion gallons, and 148.84 miles of dis- 
tribution mains. The consumption of water from the Metropolitan Water Works 
during the year by the 18 municipalities regularly supplied was 48,358,569,000 
gallons, equivalent to an average daily consumption of 132,489,200 gallons or 
98.5 gallons per capita for a population of 1,344,560 in the district supplied. 



CONSTRUCTION 

Improvement of Service in Watertown 

Work on the Watertown Branch of the Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains under 
a contract with the C. & R. Construction Company, which was nearly completed 
in 1926, was resumed April 20 and was finished May 13, with the exception of 
the work of resurfacing the streets and sidewalks in Waltham. The Contractor 
arranged with the city of Waltham to do this resurfacing at the Company's expense 
in connection with the work of widening and improving River Street, and the city 
completed the work September 7. The total value of the work done for the 
Watertown Branch under the contract in 1926 and 1927 is $72,298.23. 



12 P.D. 48 

Southern High Service Pipe Lines 

A contract was made with the Biggs Construction Company of Akron, Ohio, 
March 10, for furnishing and laying a line of riveted steel pipes 54 inches in diam- 
eter, extending easterly from Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 1 for a distance 
of about 13,500 feet to the Arborway at Pond Street in Jamaica Plain. This 
pipe line will reinforce the southern high service supply for Boston, Milton and 
Quincy. For a distance of 4,360 feet the pipe line is located in public streets and 
for the remaining distance in private lands and private ways through which ease- 
ments were taken March 10 for the pipe line location. Trench excavation was 
begun May 18. The work was delayed by unusually wet weather and at the close 
of the year there was a gap about 300 feet in length near the easterly end of the 
line where the pipes had not been laid and considerable refilling of trenches and 
resurfacing in private lands had not been completed. The value of the work done 
under the contract is $275,175.25, of which $17,640 is for rock excavation. 

Meters and Connections 

During the year Venturi meters were installed and connections were made be- 
tween the new 30-inch main and the local distribution system in Pleasant Street, 
Watertown, and between the new 54-inch main and the local distribution system 
in the Arborway in Boston. The expenditures for this work during the year 
amount to $12,071.56. 

Chlorinating Apparatus 

Chlorinating apparatus was installed in the intermediate gatehouse at Chestnut 
Hill Reservoir early in the year for chlorinating the water drawn for consumption 
from Lake Cochituate. This installation cost $2,740.28 and was put into service 
June 28. 

Improvement of Wachusett Watershed 

For improving the Wachusett watershed 8.09 acres of land on Salisbury Street 
in Holden, with the buildings thereon, was acquired from Harry G. and Sophia P. 
Waite on February 16. 

Proposed Extensions of the Works 

A contract was made with the Murray Iron Works Company of Burlington, 
Iowa, December 1, for furnishing and installing in the Arlington Pumping Station 
a new cross compound crank and fly wheel pumping engine with a capacity of 3 
million gallons a day, and the work was progressing favorably at the close of the 
year. 

Surveys for the proposed northern high-service pipe line were in progress during 
the year and are completed for the portion of the line from Main Street in Maiden 
to Broadway in Revere. 

Considerable work has been done during the year on surveys and investigations 
for the proposed Weston Aqueduct Supply Main from Weston, through Newton 
and the Brighton district of Boston, to connect with the pipe lines laid in 1926 on 
the Western Avenue and River Street bridges over the Charles River for reinforcing 
both of the 48-inch low service lines from Chestnut Hill Pumping Station to 
Spot Pond. 

MAINTENANCE 

Precipitation and Yield of Watersheds 

During the first half of the year there was an unusual deficiency of precipitation 
on all of the watersheds. The variation from normal was more than 5 inches on 
the Wachusett, more than 7 inches on the Sudbury and more than 6 inches on the 
Cochituate watershed. This was offset, however, by excessive precipitation during 
the last half of the year; the excess above the normal amounting to nearly 15 inches 
on the Wachusett, more than 13 inches on the Sudbury and more than 9 inches 
on the Cochituate watershed. 



P.D. 48 



13 



The total precipitation for the entire year was 54.67 inches or 9.31 inches above 
the average for 31 years on the Wachusett watershed, 50.73 inches or 6.14 inches 
above the average for 53 years on the Sudbury watershed and 48.22 inches or 3.13 
inches above the average for 65 years on the Cochituate watershed. The precipita- 
tion of 8 to 9| inches on all the watersheds in August, and of 7.50 and 8.21 inches, 
respectively, on the Wachusett and Sudbury watersheds in November, are especially 
noticeable. 

The average daily yield per square mile from the watersheds was 1,389,000 
gallons from the Wachusett, which is 27 per cent above the average for 31 years, 
1,411,000 gallons from the Sudbury watershed, which is 44 per cent above the aver- 
age for 53 years and 1,145,000 gallons from the Cochituate watershed, which is 
23 per cent above the average for 65 years. 

The city of Worcester discharged 256,300,000 gallons of water into the Wachu- 
sett Reservoir watershed from the area formerly tributary to the Wachusett Reser- 
voir and diverted by the city in 1911. This water was received during November 
and December and as the water did not rise to elevation 395 in the Wachusett 
Reservoir before June 15, payment to the city for this water at the rate of $2 a 
million gallons is required under the agreement made with the city, November 2, 
1914. 

Storage Reservoirs 

The capacities of the storage reservoirs of the Metropolitan Water Works, the 
elevation of the water surfaces and the quantity of water stored in each reservoir 
at the beginning and at the end of the year are shown by the following table : — 





Eleva- 
tion ' 

of 
High 

Water 


Capacity 
(Gallons) 


Jan. 1, 1927 


Jan. 1, 1928 


Storage Reservoirs 


Eleva- 
tion l 
of 

Water 
Sur- 
face 


Amount 

Stored 

(Gallons) 


Eleva- 
tion l 

of 
Water 
Sur- 
face 


Amount 

Stored 

(Gallons) 


Cochituate Watershed: — 

Lake Cochituate 2 
Sudbury Watershed: — 

Sudbury Reservoir 

Framingham Reservoir No. 1 

Framingham Reservoir No. 2 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3 

Ashland Reservoir 

Hopkinton Reservoir . 

Whitehall Reservoir 

Farm Pond 
Wachusett Watershed: — 

Wachusett Reservoir . 


144.36 

260.00 
169 . 32 
177.87 
186.74 
225.21 
305.00 
337.91 
159.25 

395.00 


2,097,100,000 

7,253,500,000 
289,900,000 3 
529,900,000 3 
1,180,000,000 3 
1,416,400,000 
1,520,900,000 
1,256,900,000 
167,500,000 

64,968,000,000 


143 . 70 

257.01 
167.83 
176.08 
184.67 
224.51 
304 . 16 
337.14 
159.49 

363.26 


1,940,600,000 

6,017,600,000 

221,700,000 

485,200,000 

1,032,700,000 

1,377,900,000 

1,468,300,000 

1,107,200,000 

180,500,000 

30,679,200,000 


143.72 

257.46 
168.10 
176.36 
185.09 
224 . 58 
304 . 40 
337.03 
159.52 

385.44 


1,945,300,000 

6,200,700,000 

233,400,000 

497,200,000 

1,066,200,000 

1,381,700,000 

1,483,300,000 

1,086,100,000 

182,100,000 

52,617,600,000 


Totals .... 


- 


80,680,100,000 


- 


44,510,900,000 


- 


66,693,600,000 



1 Elevation in feet above Boston City Base. 

2 Excluding Dudley Pond which was abandoned April 3, 1916. 

3 To top of flashboards. 

The table shows the total storage which could be drained from the reservoirs. 
Special provisions would be necessary, however, to draw about 10 billion gallons 
of this storage for consumption, as it is below the outlet channels which can be 
conveniently used for regular service. 



Wachusett Reservoir 

At the beginning of the year the water was up to elevation 363.26 with 30,- 
679,300,000 gallons in storage. By January 14 the water was down to elevation 
362.76, or 32.24 feet below the designed high-water line, with 30,274,500,000 
gallons in storage. This is the lowest stage recorded since the reservoir first filled 
in the spring of 1908. 



14 P.D. 48 

The water in the reservoir rose slowly and continuously from January 14 to 
March 8, then rapidly until March 28; during the following week only a slight 
change occurred, and on April 4 the water was at elevation 372.20 the highest 
point reached during the spring and the lowest spring peak of any year since the 
reservoir first filled. The water was then 22.80 feet below the high- water line, 
with 38,473,200,000 gallons in storage. 

From April 14 to July 30 the draft from the reservoir exceeded the inflow and 
the water went down at the rate of about 2 feet a month to elevation 364.63. 
Following heavy rainfall in August the water rose in the reservoir at the rate of 
about 2 feet a month until November 3. 

As a result of the unusually heavy rainfall during the remainder of the year 
the water rose in the reservoir at the rate of about 7 feet a month and was up to 
elevation 385.44 or 9.56 feet below high-water line at the end of the year, with 
52,617,600,000 gallons in storage, a gain in storage of 21,938,300,000 gallons 
during the year. 

In compliance with General Laws, chapter 92, section 14, there was discharged 
into the Nashua River from the reservoir 625,500,000 gallons of water to maintain 
a flow in the river below the dam. 

The town of Clinton pumped 35,600,000 gallons of water from the Wachusett 
supply under the provisions of Acts of 1923, chapter 348. A portion of this water 
was used because of the poor quality of the water in the town's storage reservoir 
in July, August and September. 

The city of Worcester did not pump water from the Wachusett Reservoir during 
the year. 

The fencing of the reservoir lands, begun in 1921, was continued for a distance 
of 2.4 miles, making a total of about 293^ miles now completed. 

The Metropolitan District Water Suppry Commission constructed a portion of 
a 22,000 volt transmission line, for delivery of electric power to the contractors on 
the new tunnel, along the shore of the Wachusett Reservoir in West Boylston 
and of the Quinapoxet River in Holden on Water Division land for a distance of 
about 2% miles, and is using about 10 acres of Water Division land near the 
circular dam at the mouth of the Quinapoxet River in West Boylston for the 
operations at Shaft No. 1 of the new tunnel. This necessitated an expenditure of 
$912 by the Water Division for transplanting 2,183 red pine trees 4 to 8 feet high 
and the building of 480 feet of wire fence. 

The usual work of cutting and burning brush and weeds along the margins of 
the reservoir, the sides of adjacent highways and of the brooks and rivers which 
flow directly into the reservoir and at the North and South dikes has been done 
at a cost of $4,485. 

All perennials over 6 inches high were pulled from about 1,200 acres of the 
exposed reservoir bottom above elevation 373 at a cost of $1,700. Removal of 
the smaller perennials and the annuals from this area was not attempted. 

The Department buildings near the dam in Clinton and on the reservoir lands 
in Boylston, West Boylston and Sterling have been kept in good order. A new 
barn was built at the foreman's headquarters in Lancaster Street in West Boylston 
in place of the barn that was struck by lightning and destroyed by fire in October, 
1926, and a new horse was purchased to replace the one lost in the fire. 

Sudbury Reservoir 

At the beginning of the year the water in the Sudbury Reservoir was about 
2 feet below the crest of the overflow which at this reservoir is at elevation 259. 
The water was kept between 1.4 feet and 2.3 feet below the crest until April 18 
when the flashboards were put on the overflow. The water was then kept slightly 
above the crest until the flashboards were taken off November 28 and thereafter 
until the end of the year the water was kept about 1.5 feet below the crest. No 
water overflowed from the reservoir during the year. 

During November and December the Metropolitan District Water Supply 
Commission discharged 116,400,000 gallons of water from the Hopkinton Reser- 
voir into the Sudbury Reservoir in testing the new pipe lines and pumping station 



P.D. 48 15 

which it had constructed for diverting water from the portion of the Sudbury 
watershed above the Hopkinton and Cordaville dams into the Sudbury Reservoir, 
but on account of the large yield of water of better quality from the portion of the 
Sudbury watershed above the dam of Framingham Reservoir No. 3 and the Wa- 
chusett and Lake Cochituate watersheds the new works have not been put into 
regular service. The usual work has been done on the Sudbury Reservoir lands 
and structures. 

Framingham Reservoir No. 8 

The flashboards were kept on the overflow of the dam at Framingham Reser- 
voir No. 3 during the entire year, as usual. The water was drawn to elevation 
182.53 in February and rose to the top of the flashboards, elevation 186.50 in 
November, but no water overflowed from the reservoir. The grounds and 
structures received the usual care. 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2, Ashland, Hopkinton and Whitehall Reservoirs 

and Farm Pond 

The maintenance operations at the reservoirs in the southern portion of the 
Sudbury watershed have been unusual on account of the construction work in 
this area by the Metropolitan District Water Supply Commission, and in connec- 
tion therewith the water was lowered in Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2 
beginning on July 30, and was kept down until December 12, when the waste 
gates were closed and the reservoirs were allowed to fill. The water was kept 
above the usual elevation in the Ashland, Hopkinton and Whitehall reservoirs 
until the latter part of the year when it became evident that it would not be re- 
quired for consumption. 

On account of the heavy rainfall on November 3, while construction work was 
in progress at the outlet of Whitehall Reservoir, the water rose 1.12 feet in less 
than 24 hours, to elevation 339.12 and 1.21 feet above elevation 337.91, the normal 
high-water line, the record height for this reservoir and practically to the top of 
tfye dam at the outlet. 

There are now 86 camps on the land adjoining Whitehall Reservoir, as one camp 
was destroyed by fire and another was removed during the year. 

The changes made during the year in the existing southern Sudbury works in- 
clude the installation of chlorine control apparatus in the gate-house at Framing- 
ham Dam No. 1; the removal of the old sluice gates Nos. 3, 6 and 7, and installa- 
tion of a new 20-inch gate valve and 24-inch overflow pipe at Framingham Dam 
No. 2; the installation of a 48-inch by 30-inch sluice gate on the westerly 48-inch 
waste pipe in the gate-house at Ashland Reservoir and on the easterly 48-inch 
waste pipe of a 30-inch by 20-inch branch with 20-inch gate valve and Venturi 
meter on the branch line and a 20-inch blow-off valve on the main pipe near its 
outer end; the installation in the westerly 48-inch waste pipe at the Hopkinton 
Dam of a 36-inch by 24-inch branch with a 24-inch gate valve on the branch line 
and a 36-inch blow-off valve on the main line, the removal of the easterly flap- 
gate and building in of a 20-inch pipe line in front of the easterly sluice gate at 
the gate-house at Whitehall Reservoir. 

Farm Pond is not used now by the Metropolitan Water District or the town of 
Framingham for water supply. In the latter part of the year 213,800,000 gallons 
of water was wasted from the pond into the Sudbury River. Water in the pond 
rose to an unusual height, elevation 159.89, following the heavy rainfall of Novem- 
ber 3. 

Under rights reserved by legislation the Boston & Albany Railroad took approxi- 
mately 70,700,000 gallons of water and the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad took approximately 58,400,000 gallons of water from Farm Pond for use 
in locomotives. 

Lake Cochituate 

The water in Lake Cochituate has been near the normal high-water line, eleva- 
tion 144.36, during the entire year and was at the lowest stage, elevation 142.23, 
in February, and at the highest stage, elevation 144.83, in May. 



16 P.D. 48 

Water was drawn from the lake for consumption beginning January 4. but on 
account of an objectionable taste and odor, caused by an abundant growth of 
microscopic organisms, the use of the water was stopped on January 20. To 
remedy this condition copper sulphate was applied to the water as an algaecide. 
During the last week in April 4,100 pounds of copper sulphate was applied to the 
water in the lake; this was equivalent to 2 pounds to a million gallons of water. 
A second application of 5,125 pounds of copper sulphate, equivalent to 2Vi pounds 
to a million gallons of water, was made May 12 to 14, inclusive, and a third appli- 
cation of 6,150 pounds, equivalent to 3 pounds to a million gallons of water, was 
made June 6 to 9 inclusive. On June 24 the use of water from the lake was re- 
sumed and as the water has since then been of satisfactory quality, its use was 
continued until the end of the year; the usual draft was at the rate of about 15 
million gallons a day. The total quantity of water used from the lake during the 
year was 2,465,200,000 gallons, all of which was sterilized with chlorine as it flowed 
from the Cochituate Aqueduct into the Chestnut Hill Reservoir. During the year 
4,486,100,000 gallons of water was wasted from the lake at the dam. 

The usual care was taken of the water works lands and structures at the lake. 

There are now 217 cottages, 67 garages and 4 stables on the private lands ad- 
joining the water works lands on the shore of the lake. 

Aqueducts 

The Wachusett Aqueduct was in regular use except from November 4 to De- 
cember 4, inclusive, and water was drawn from the Wachusett Reservoir through 
the aqueduct on 274 days. The total quantity drawn was 32,363,300,000 gallons, 
equivalent to an average flow of 88,667,000 gallons a day for the entire year. 
All of the water was used for the generation of electric energy at the power station 
before it was discharged into the aqueduct. 

The Westborough State Hospital pumped 99,810,000 gallons of water from the 
aqueduct at the terminal chamber during the year, an average consumption of 
251,500 gallons a day. 

The Weston Aqueduct was in regular use throughout the year and delivered to 
the Weston Reservoir and Supply Pipe Lines 36,958,100,000 gallons of water, an 
average of 101,255,000 gallons a day, all of which was used for generating electric 
energy at the Sudbury power station before it was discharged into the aqueduct. 

The Sudbury Aqueduct was in regular use throughout the year. The entire 
supply for this aqueduct, amounting to 8,642,100,000 gallons was drawn from 
Framingham Reservoir No. 3. The town of Framingham pumped 511,043,889 
gallons of this water for its supply and the remainder 8,131,000,000 gallons, 
equivalent to an average of 22,277,000 gallons a day, was delivered to Chestnut 
Hill Reservoir for use in the Metropolitan Water District. 

The Cochituate Aqueduct was in use from January 4 to January 20 and from 
June 24 to the end of the year, with the exception of November 7 and 8, a total 
of 206 days. During this time 2,465,200,000 gallons of water was drawn from 
Lake Cochituate through the aqueduct, the equivalent of an average flow of 
6,753,000 gallons a day for the entire year. 

The total quantity of water drawn from the storage reservoirs through the 
aqueducts for consumption is 804,269,000 gallons less than the total water supplied 
from the Distribution Works; this difference is accounted for by making reason- 
able allowance for the yield of the Spot Pond watershed, for leakage of ground 
water into the aqueducts and for the different methods of measurement of these 
large volumes of water, and indicates that leakage from the distribution mains 
must be very small. 

The ordinary maintenance of these aqueducts has been attended to by the regu- 
lar maintenance forces in the usual manner. A cave-in occurred on the Weston 
Aqueduct, over tunnel No. 1, about 310 feet east of the head-house, without 
affecting the structure in any way. About 75 cubic yards of earth were used in 
refilling the cavity. 

The brick facing on the northerly side of the Sudbury Aqueduct, where it is 
located on the Waban Valley Bridge in Wellesley, was entirely rebuilt as it had 



P.D. 48 17 

been loosened and forced out of place by the freezing of the water that had leaked 
down from the floor of the bridge which forms the roof over the aqueduct. In 
connection with this work the joints in the masonry floor were repointed with 
elastic cement. The cost of the repairs was $7,393.75 for masons and helpers and 
$1,642.97 for materials used. 

Protection of Water Supply 

At the beginning of the year the usual force, including a sanitary inspector, 
2 watershed inspectors and 3 watchmen were employed inspecting the condition 
of premises on the watersheds, ice-cutting operations and preventing pollution of 
the water supply. Since July 20 three additional watchmen have been employed 
on account of the contemplated use of water from the Ashland, Hopkinton and 
Whitehall reservoirs which had not been used for many years. 

The sewage from the Worcester County Training School in West Boylston was 
purified by nitration throughout the year and the sewage from the summer cot- 
tages near Gates Terrace, at Sterling Junction, was purified from May 1 to 
September 30, inclusive. 

The surface water from the village of Sterling, the brook near Maple Street in 
Marlborough and Pegan Brook in Natick has been purified by filtration, with the 
exception of large flows in excess of the capacity of the niters which was sterilized 
with calcium hypochlorite. 

The Pegan pumping station was operated on 298 days and 389,051,000 gallons 
of water was pumped to the niters, an average of 1,065,893 gallons per day for 
the entire year. The cost of operating the station, including the care of the grounds 
and filters, was $5,776.45 for labor, $711.36 for fuel and $819.65 for supplies and 
repairs, a total of $7,307.46 and $18.78 per million gallons filtered. The fuel cost 
per million foot gallons was 12.98 cents. A small earth dam was built across the 
so-called bed No. 6, near its westerly end, to keep the unfiltered water from reach- 
ing what appears to be a rock fill under the railroad and through it entering the 
lake without being filtered at all. 

Following the heavy rain of November 3 the water in Beaver Dam Brook was 
sterilized with calcium hypochlorite for a period of 13 days as it flowed past the 
Mill Street Bridge into Lake Cochituate. 

The cost of protecting the water supply by filtration and chlorination was 
$948 on the Wachusett watershed, $5,375 on the Sudbury watershed and about 
$7,735 on the Cochituate watershed. 

The usual work of caring for the ditches, culverts and watering places and 
improving brook channels was accomplished. 

The cost of maintaining the 37 miles of drainage ditches on all of the water- 
sheds was about $6,530, considerable repair work being necessary. 

The number of manufacturing plants on the watershed was reduced this year 
by the burning of the Buck chair-finishing factory in Sterling Center on June 2 
and the Sterling cider mill on November 4, and by the purchase of the Noack 
shoddy mill in Holden by the Metropolitan District Water Supply Commission 
on August 9. There are now only three mills left on the watershed and of these 
only the Jefferson Manufacturing Company in Eagleville and Buck's chair factory 
in West Sterling are running at present. 

New filter-beds were built at the Fay School in Southborough in accordance 
with plans approved by the Division. 

Because of the lack of demand for woolen blankets the Cordaville Woolen 
Company changed in the fall of 1926 from the manufacture of blankets to tweeds 
and suede velours. This business not proving successful they finally closed the 
mill permanently the latter part of January, 1927, and offered the plant for sale. 
About two years ago a public dump was started at the edge of Cedar Swamp, 
on the Cordaville Road, just below the village of Hopkinton. As no serious 
attempt was made by the town authorities to keep it in order or to prevent pollu- 
tion of the water supply it was cleaned up by the Division in preparation for the 
contemplated use of Hopkinton Reservoir for water supply. 

In connection with the building of a large gas generating plant by the West 



18 P.D. 48 

Boston Gas Company on the swampy area adjoining Beaver Dam Brook near 
Irving Street in Framingham, sedimentation basins and filter-beds were con- 
structed to prevent pollution of the water in the brook. 

All of the mill buildings and all but three of the dwellings have now been removed 
at the Dawson Mill property on Salisbury Street in Holden, which was acquired 
in 1926. 

Since early in June the Division has cared for the mill property at West 
Rutland in the Ware River watershed. This property was acquired from the 
Rutland Worsted Company by the Metropolitan District Water Supply Com- 
mission on June 1. It includes 107 acres of land and water rights in Demond Pond, 
which has an area of about 120 acres. The mill is located at the middle water 
privilege; the upper and lower privileges had not been used in recent years. All 
of the other buildings in the surrounding village, with the exception of the school- 
house and one or two dwellings, were owned by the Company, and of these nine 
dwellings are now occupied by tenants of the Commonwealth. 

Clinton Sewage Disposal 

The works for disposing of the sewage of the town of Clinton were operated 
throughout the year, as required by Acts of 1898, chapter 557 and 570,847,000 
gallons of sewage was pumped to the filters, an average of 1,564,000 gallons a day. 

During the heavy rain storm of November 4 about 60 linear feet of the inter- 
cepting sewer embankment was washed out, crushing the 24-inch vitrified pipe 
and for nine days, while repairs were being made, a portion of the sewage flowed 
directly into the Nashua River. The cost of the repairs was $941.33. A portion 
of the sewage also overflowed into the river on six days in September when the 
flow exceeded the capacity of the pump. From September 19 to October 16, 
inclusive, a portion of the sewage was discharged on the low land near the filters, 
while the sludge tanks and filter-beds were being prepared for winter service. 

The volume of sewage to be disposed of now exceeds the capacity of the existing 
works and extensive improvements should be made in order to dispose of it in a 
satisfactory manner. 

The requirement of the town of Clinton that the overhead wires in High and 
Mechanic streets should be removed, necessitated the removal of 3,300 feet of 
the power transmission line over which the electric energy is transmitted from the 
Wachusett Power Station to the sewerage pumping station and the installation 
of a new line in Chestnut and Water streets, for a distance of 3,900 feet, at a 
cost of $1,461.49. As the bronze runners and wearing rings of the pump were 
giving unsatisfactory service, a set of manganese steel runners and rings was 
installed September 12 at a cost of $491.60, with satisfactory results. 

For the past year the cost of operating the pumping station, including the unusual 
expense for transmission line and pump, was $5,232.01 or $9.17 per million gallons 
of sewage pumped. The cost of operating the filters and intercepting sewer, 
including the unusual expenditures for repairing the sewer, was $11,015.37 or 
$19.30 a million gallons of sewage disposed of. 

Forestry 

In the Wachusett Section about 2,800 4-year old white spruce seedlings were 
planted on Water Works land bordering the open channel portion of the Wachusett 
Aqueduct in Marlborough and Southborough and on the margins of the Wachusett 
Reservoir in Boylston and West Boylston. About 1,400 white pine and cedar 
trees 4 to 6 feet high were transplanted from a natural stand in Big Crane Swamp 
in Westborough to aqueduct land near the terminal chamber in Northborough. 
This was the only new planting done during the year. 

In the Sudbury Section 155 red pines and 2,426 white pines were set out to replace 
dead trees in former plantings and 7,628 pine trees from 3 to 15 feet in height were 
destroyed by fires. 

The usual work was done clearing areas for future planting, making improve- 



P.D. 48 19 

ment thinnings and cutting mature and diseased trees for fence posts, destroying 
insects and clearing fire guards. 

The total expenditure for forestry was $33,976.13, of which $3,415.83 was ex- 
pended for protecting the trees and plantings from insects. 

Hydroelectric Service 

During the year 9,255,594 kilowatt hours of electric energy were delivered from 
the hydroelectric stations operated by water drawn from the Wachusett and 
Sudbury reservoirs. 

The total value of this energy at contract prices and including rentals of $182.20 
for transmission line locations is $52,547.39. The total expense charged to opera- 
tion of both stations and transmission lines is $54,223.41, leaving a loss from the 
operation of the stations of $1,676.02. This loss is due principally to the unusual 
repairs, costing about $4,600, on Unit No. 4, and the reduced output at the Wachu- 
sett Station on account of the low water in the reservoir, and to the reduced output 
and increased expense of three shift operation at the Sudbury Station on account 
of the increased quantity of water supplied to the District by gravity through the 
Weston Aqueduct since the completion of the new supply main for the northern 
low service. 

The Wachusett Power Station was operated on 274 days. The statistics for the 
year 1927 are as follows: 

Total energy developed (kilowatt hours) . . . 5,405,600 
Energy used at power station (kilowatt hours) . . 192,190 



Available energy (kilowatt hours) 5,213,410 

Water used (gallons) 32,363,300,000 

Average head (feet) 74 . 4 

Energy developed per million foot gallons (kilowatt hours) . . 2 . 245 

Efficiency of station (per cent) 71.44 

Credits : 

Energy sold New England Power Company and 
Edison Electric Illuminating Company 4,995,774 
kilowatt hours at $0.0053 . . . . . $26,477 60 

Deduction of 2 per cent as provided in contract, 

99,915 kilowatt hours at $0.0053 .... 529 55 



$25,948 05 



Energy furnished Clinton Sewerage Pumping Sta- 
tion, 217,636 kilowatt hours at $0.0053 . 1,153 47 
Rental, transmission line location .... 182 20 



Charges : 

Superintendence $1,536 30 

Labor, operating station 8,758 38 

Repairs and supplies: 

Power Station 5,401 42 

Transmission line 65 16 



$27,283 72 



$15,761 26 

Taxes 2,687 50 

Administration, general supervision, interest and 

sinking fund 11,258 63 



29,707 39 



Loss $2,423 67 

Cost of available energy per thousand kilowatt hours ... $5 . 698 



20 P.D. 48 

The Sudbury Power Station was in service on 365 days. The statistics for the 
year 1927 are as follows: 

Total energy developed (kilowatt hours) . . . 4,113,410 
Energy used at power station (kilowatt hours) . . 71,226 



Available energy (kilowatt hours) 4,042,184 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3 service: 

Water used (gallons) 7,046,600,000 

Average head (feet) 65 . 39 

Weston Aqueduct service: 

Water used (gallons) 36,958,100,000 

Average head (feet) 38.18 

Energy developed per million foot gallons (kilowatt hours) . . 2. 197 

Efficiency of station (per cent) 70 . 

Credits : 

Energy sold Edison Electric Illuminating Company of Boston, 

4,042,184 kilowatt hours at $0.00625 . . . ' . . $25,263 67 

Charges : 

Superintendence $1,569 14 

Labor, operating station 13,944 21 

Repairs and supplies 858 98 



$16,372 33 
Taxes . . . . .... . . 1,934 40 

Administration, general supervision, interest and 

sinking fund 6,209 29 



24,516 02 



Profit $747 65 

Cost of available energy per thousand kilowatt hours ... $6 . 065 

Distribution Pumping Stations 

The total pumpage at the five distribution pumping stations during 1927 was 
25.208 billion gallons or 0.121 billion gallons more than in 1926. This slight in- 
crease in pumping over the former year is more than accounted for by an increase 
of 0.358 billion gallons pumped for the city of Newton to supplement its own sup- 
ply while improvements which the city is making in its works were in progress. 

At the beginning of the year there were 1,085 net tons of bituminous coal and 
75 net tons of anthracite screenings on hand at the pumping stations. During 
the year 11,125 net tons of bituminous coal and 228 net tons of anthracite screen- 
ings were received. At the close of the year 1,909 net tons of bituminous coal and 
62 net tons of anthracite screenings were on hand at the pumping stations. 

At Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 1, Engine No. 1 which has been in serv- 
ice 40 years was put in good condition for short runs because of the convenience 
of using its small capacity at times to make up a small deficiency in supply during 
peak load periods which otherwise would have to be made up by operating one 
of the modern engines of much larger capacity than required for the demand. 
The lubricating system of Engine No. 3 and jacket piping and drips on this engine 
have been very much simplified and changes have been made to facilitate the 
starting of the engine. The cylinder valve stems and dependent air compressor 
on Engine No. 4 were repacked. New force main gages were installed for each 
of these engines. The brass hooks of the high and low pressure cylinder inlet 
valve gears on Engine No. 16 which had become worn were replaced with steel 
hooks. New wedge bolts for connecting rod boxes and new box for the low pres- 
sure crank connection bearing were installed and other repairs and adjustments 
made on Engine No. 16. The main bearing boxes on the electric lighting engine 
were rebabbitted and a steel coupling was installed on the main shaft in place of 



P.D. 48 21 

the cast-iron split coupling. A gravity oiling system was installed on this unit. 
The five boilers at this station have been regularly inspected and necessary re- 
pairs and some improvements have been made to the equipment, which is in 
good order. Pressure piping and control valves were installed for operating two 
new hydraulic valves on the force mains in the rear of the station. 

At Chestnut Hill Station No. 2 pump valves and packings were renewed on 
low-service engines Nos. 5, 6 and 7. A broken stem on No. 5 valve on the equalizer 
pipe was replaced. High-service engine No. 12 was in continuous operation for 
eleven months, except for a few necessary interruptions of short duration for 
renewals of pump valves and repacking of dependent boiler feed pump plungers 
and other minor repairs and adjustments, but on account of an accident which 
occurred at 12.10 a.m. December 1 the engine was out of service for repairs the 
remainder of the year. Apparently one of the %-inch stud bolts on the front top 
poppet valve of the low pressure cylinder became loose and dropped down on top 
of the piston which, on its upward stroke, forced the bolt up against and broke 
the valve, parts of which also dropped down on the piston and were forced up 
against and cracked the cylinder head. The necessary repair parts were immedi- 
ately ordered by telephone from the engine builder's shop, including piston rod 
and nuts and two poppet valve discs of an improved design, without the stud bolts 
which had caused the accident. The two old poppet valve seats were turned 
true at the Atlantic Works in East Boston and the crack in the cjdincler head was 
brazed by a man from these works with an acetylene torch. Repairs were com- 
pleted at the close of the year with the exception of some of the erecting work 
and necessary adjustments. While waiting for the new parts to arrive from the 
shop a large amount of general repair work was done on other parts of the engine. 
Expenditures for repairing the damage resulting from this accident and of making 
the other repairs amount to about $4,000. The five boilers at this station have 
been regularly inspected and are in good condition. All necessary repairs and 
some improvements have been made to boiler room equipment. A section of 
the smoke flue between the boiler room and the brick chimney, where exposed in 
the coal shed, was replaced on account of the corrosion of the original steel plates. 
The two electric lighting units at this station have received the usual attention 
and are in good order. 

The blacksmithing, carpentry and machinists' work for all of the pumping 
stations has been done as usual at the Chestnut Hill shops and considerable work 
of this nature has also been done at these shops for the other sections of the Water 
Division. 

A.t the Spot Pond Station most of the pumping has been done with the new 
engine, No. 17, and engines Nos. 8 and 9 have been kept in good order for emer- 
gency use. The four boilers at this station have been regularly inspected and 
are in good condition. The old wooden top of the ash tank was replaced with 
a new steel top. All necessary repairs to engines and boilers have been made at 
this station. 

At the Arlington and Hyde Park stations the engines and boilers have been 
kept in good condition and the boiler settings have been repaired. At Hyde Park 
Station a section of the smoke flue between the boiler room and the brick chimney, 
where exposed to the weather, was replaced on account of the corrosion of the 
original steel plates. 

All of the pumping station buildings have been kept in good repair and painting 
has been done when necessary for the proper protection of metal and wood work. 

By arrangement with the city of Newton 505,672,000 gallons of water have been 
pumped at its Ward Street booster station for use on the high land in Watertown 
and Belmont where satisfactory service was not furnished from our Waban Hill 
Reservoir. 

Th 3 engine duties at the various stations, based on plunger displacement and 
including the coal used in generating the steam for heating and lighting the stations, 
were as follows : — 

Chestnut Hill Station No. 1, 126,655,000 foot pounds per 100 pounds of bitumi- 
nous coal averaging 14,615 British thermal units per pound. 



22 



P.D. 48 



Chestnut Hill Station No. 2, 137,624,000 foot pounds per 100 pounds of bitu- 
minous coal averaging 14,620 British thermal units per pound. 

Spot Pond Station,. 110,860,000 foot pounds per 100 pounds of bituminous 
coal averaging 14,766 British thermal units per pound. The fires are banked 
for a portion of each day at this station. 

Arlington Station, 78,365,000 foot pounds per 100 pounds of bituminous coal 
averaging 14,547 British thermal units per pound. 

Hyde Park Station, 66,710,000 foot pounds per 100 pounds of mixed coal aver- 
aging 13,298 British thermal units per pound. The fires are banked for a portion 
of each day at this station. 

Distribution Reservoirs 

The locations, elevations, and capacities of the distribution reservoirs of the 
Metropolitan Water Works are shown by the following table : — 



Distribution Reservoirs and Locations 


Elevation of 
High Water ' 


Capacity in 
Gallons 


Low Service: 






Spot Pond, Stoneham and Medford ...... 


163.00 


1,791,700,000 


Chestnut Hill Reservoir, Brighton district of Boston 


134.00 


300,000,000 


Weston Reservoir, Weston ........ 


200.00 


200,000,000 


Mystic Reservoir, Medford ........ 


157.00 


26,200,000 


Northern High Service: 






Fells Reservoir, Stoneham 


271.00 


41,400,000 


Bear Hill Reservoir, Stoneham ....... 


300 . 00 


2,450,000 


Northern Extra High Service: 






Arlington Reservoir, steel tank, Arlington ..... 


442 . 50 


2,000,003 


Southern High Service: 






Fisher Hill Reservoir, Brookline ....... 


251.00 


15,500,000 


Waban Hill Reservoir, Newton ....... 


264 . 50 


13,500,000 


Forbes Hill Reservoir, Quincy ....... 


192 . 00 


5,100,000 


Forbes Hill Standpipe, Quincy ....... 


251.00 


330,000 


Southern Extra High Service: 






Bellevue Reservoir, steel tank, West Roxbury district of Boston 


375.00 


2,500,000 


Total 


- 


2,400,680,003 



1 Elevation in feet above Boston City Base. 

By arrangement with the city of Chelsea a portion of the maintenance of its 
reservoir on Powder Horn Hill is assumed by the Metropolitan Water Works, 
and the reservoir is used when necessary in connection with the northern high- 
service supply. This reservoir has a capacity of 1,000,000 gallons with high- water 
line at elevation 196.6. The reservoir was in service from January 1 to March 11 
and from December 22 to the end of the year, and was kept full of water for emer- 
gency use the remainder of the time. 

The Mystic Reservoir was not in service during the year but was kept full of 
water ready for emergency use. 

All of the other distribution reservoirs were in regular service throughout the 
year, with the exception that the Bradlee basin of the Chestnut Hill Reservoir 
was out of service from October 3 to 7 on account of finding the body of Thomas 
J. Brutcher in the water, and the Lawrence basin was out of service from January 
27 to February 19, March 22 to December 13 and from December 16 to 31 on ac- 
count of growths of microscopic organisms that gave the water an objectionable 
taste and odor which made its use undesirable. The usual care has been taken 
of the grounds and structures at all of the reservoirs. 

The Parks Division was paid $5,035.35 for policing at Chestnut Hill Reservoir 
and $1,139.54 for policing at Spot Pond and the Fells and Bear Hill reservoirs. 

Low sections of walks and grass borders along the driveways at Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir were raised to prevent overflow of surface water into the reservoir 
during heavy rains. The dome of the masonry tower at the Arlington Reservoir 
was waterproofed. 

On account of unsatisfactory telephone service at the Spot Pond pumping station 
an underground fibre duct was laid from Woodland Road to the pumping station 
for a new telephone cable. 



P.D. 48 23 

Distribution Pipe Lines 

The additional low-service connection made in 1926 with the city of Somer- 
ville distribution system in the Fellswajr at Middlesex Avenue was put into service 
January 25 and the Watertown Branch of the Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains 
was put into regular service June 27. 

The 30-inch force main from Chestnut Hill Pumping Station to the Fisher Hill 
Reservoir was out of service from January 1 to 7 in connection with the rebuilding 
of the highway bridge on Chestnut Hill Avenue over the Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Two emergency connections were made between the 60-inch Weston Aqueduct 
Supply Main in Waltham and the city's distribution system, one at Waltham 
Common on February 3, the other at the pumping station near South Street on 
March 16. An emergency connection was installed May 27 between the Water- 
town Branch of the Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains and the city of Cambridge 
mains in River Street near Clark Road in Waltham. 

One break occurred in the distribution pipe lines during the year. The 36- 
inch southern high-service main in Morton Street at Fairbanks Avenue, Dorchester, 
was broken on July 21 by the blasting operations of a contractor employed by the 
Boston Consolidated Gas Company. The cost of making the repairs to the 
Metropolitan main was $536.02, which was borne by the contractor. No account 
was kept of the expense to the contractor. 

During the year there were 53 leaks in the main pipe lines, which were repaired 
at a total cost of $3,201.50. Of this number 13 were from defective wooden joints, 
which cost $772.40 to repair. The remainder were divided as follows: 33 from 
lead joints in cast iron mains, 4 from calomine pipe and 3 Hydrotite joints. 

The usual maintenance work has been done along the various pipe lines and 
at the pipe bridges. 

There are now 76 Venturi meters from 6 to 60 inches in diameter in the dis- 
tribution pipe lines. Sixty-four of these are on connections supplying various 
towns in the Metropolitan Water District, 4 on Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains, 
1 each at the Hyde Park, Spot Pond and Arlington pumping stations and on 
emergency connections to Cambridge, Newton and Wakefield, 1 between the 
Fisher Hill force main and the Spot Pond main and 1 on the Clinton Road line 
in front of effluent gate-house No. 1 at Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

Of the 10 pressure regulating valves for reducing the pressure of water supplied 
to Revere, Swampscott and Winthrop and to portions of Chelsea, East Boston 
and Hyde Park, 7 are in regular use and have given satisfactory service and the 
others are kept in good order for emergency use. 

Recording pressure gages have been maintained at 24 stations on the distribu- 
tion sj^stem and tables in the Appendix show the hydraulic grade at 17 of these 
stations as determined from the charts. 

Pipes, specials and other materials and supplies required for maintaining and 
operating the pipe lines have been kept on hand at the Glenwood pipe yard in 
Medf ord and at the Chestnut Hill pipe yard in Brighton, and an auto truck equipped 
with a gate-operating attachment has been stationed at each yard, with men on 
duty ready to operate them in case of emergency any time during the day or night. 
A third auto truck, equipped with gate-operating attachment, has also been 
maintained for relief service in case either of the other trucks is out of commission 
for any reason. 

Consumption of Water 

During the year 48,358,569,000 gallons of water were furnished from the Metro- 
politan Water Works to the 18 cities and towns supplied. This is equivalent to 
an average daily consumption of 132,489,200 gallons, and for the estimated popu- 
lation of 1,344,560 is at the rate of 98.5 gallons per capita, slightly in excess of the 
consumption in 1926. 

The town of Brookline, with an estimated population of 44,550, was supplied 
from its local source, and the average daily consumption was 4,238,300 gallons, 
equivalent to 95 gallons per capita. The total consumption of the town was 
1,546,970,000 gallons, of which 296,365,000 gallons was supplied from elevation 
375 and 1,250,605,000 gallons was supplied from elevation 250. 



24 



P.D. 48 



The city of Newton, with an estimated population of 56,000, was supplied 
from its local source, with the exception of 683,038,000 gallons of water drawn 
from the Metropolitan supply through the emergency connection on Ward Street. 
Including this water, the average daily consumption was 4,394,100 gallons, 
equivalent to 78 gallons per capita. 

Under special arrangements the city of Quincy supplied 26,255,000 gallons of 
water to the United States Government Reservation on Peddock's Island and 
232,000 gallons to the town of Braintree; the town of Arlington supplied 333,000 
gallons to the town of Winchester and the city of Melrose supplied 20,000 gallons 
to the town of Saugus. 

The population, consumption of water and per cent of services metered in the 
Metropolitan Water District as supplied in 1927, and for the period from 1890 to 
1927, inclusive, are shown graphically by the accompanying diagram. 

On account of the rapid filling of the storage reservoirs during the latter portion 
of the year there was a noticeable increase in the color of the water supplied, which 
was the cause of some complaint, but from storage in the reservoirs the quality 
of the water is improving as a result of sedimentation and the bleaching action of 
the sunlight. 

The average daily consumption of water in each of the municipalities in the 
Metropolitan Water District during 1926 and 1927, is as follows: 







Estimated 

Popula- 
tion, 1927 




Average 


Daily Consumption 






1926 


1927 


Increase 












in 






Gallons 


Gallons 
per Capita ' 


Gallons 


Gallons 
per Capita ' 


Gallons 


Arlington 


26,940 


1,504,400 


58 


1,528,000 


57 


23,600 


Belmont 




16,680 


1,056,900 


66 


938,000 


56 


118,900 2 


Boston 




797,870 


91,275,700 


116 


92,751,500 


116 


1,475,800 


Chelsea 




48,460 


3,474,400 


72 


3,441,400 


71 


33,000 2 


Everett 




42,700 


5,215,900 


123 


4,909,300 


115 


306,600 2 


Lexington 




8,230 


517,000 


64 


529,800 


64 


12,800 


Maiden 




52,760 


3,139,800 


60 


3,419,000 


65 


279,200 


Medford 




50,830 


2,522,400 


51 


2,877,700 


57 


355,300 


Melrose 




20,960 


1,379,600 


67 


1,342,500 


64 


37,100 2 


Milton 




13,820 


701,600 


52 


703,400 


51 


1,800 


Nahant 




1,700 


178,200 


107 


170,600 


100 


7,600 2 


Quincy 




64,380 


4,757,000 


76 


5,001,000 


78 


244,000 


Revere 




35,000 


2,263,800 


66 


2,377,300 


68 


113,500 


Somerville 




101,590 


7,791,000 


78 


7,946,000 


78 


155,000 


Stoneham 




9,490 


560,000 


60 


498,000 


52 


62,000 2 


Swampscott 




9,230 


720,800 


78 


688,300 


75 


32,500 2 


Watertown 




27,000 


2,059,300 


78 


2,256,700 


84 


197,400 


Winthrop 




16,920 


1,067,000 


64 


1,110,700 


66 


43,700 


District Supplied 


1,344,560 


130,184,800 


98 


132,489,200 


99 


2,304,400 


Brookline 


44,550 


4,212,500 


96 


4,238,300 


95 


25,800 


Newton 


56,000 


4,252,800 


78 


4,394,100 


78 


141,300 


Total Di 


strict 


1,445,110 


138,650,100 


97 


141,121,600 


98 


2,471,500 



1 Nearest whole number. 



2 Decrease. 



P.D. 48 25 

The consumption by districts in 1927 as compared with 1926 is as follows: 





Gallons 

per Day 

1927 


Increase from 1926 


• 


Gallons 
per Day 


Percent- 
age 


Low-service district, embracing the low-service districts of Ar- 
lington, Belmont, Boston, Chelsea, Everett, Maiden, Medford, 
Somerville and Watertown ...... 

Southern high-service district, embracing Quincy, the high- 
service district of Boston, except East Boston, and portions of 
Milton and Watertown ....... 

Southern Intermediate high-service, embracing portions of Bel- 
mont and Watertown ....... 

Northern high-service district, embracing Melrose, Nahant, 
Revere, Stoneham, Swampscott and Winthrop and the high- 
service districts of Chelsea, East Boston, Everett, Maiden, 
Medford and Somerville ....... 

Southern extra high-service district, embracing the higher por- 
tions of Hyde Park, Milton and West Roxbury 

Northern extra high-service district, embracing Lexington and 
the higher portions of Arlington and Belmont 


72,502,400 

44,725,900 
1,371,400 

11,341,400 
1,307,800 
1,240,300 


_ i 

_ i 
_ i 

280,200 
102,700 
14,100 2 


2.53 

8.52 

1.12 2 


District Supplied ........ 

Brookline and Newton ....... 


132,489,200 
8,632,400 


2,304,400 
167,100 


1.77 
1.97 


Total District ........ 


141,121,600 


2,471,500 


1.78 



1 Boundary of district not the same as in 1926. 



2 Decrease. 



Through the emergency connection on Ward Street near Hammond Street, 
water was furnished to the city of Newton every month in the year, the total 
quantity supplied being 683,038,000 gallons or 669,538,000 gallons in excess of the 
quantity the city is entitled to take free of charge under the agreement made in 
1900, when the Waban Hill Reservoir was purchased from the city, and for this 
water the city will pay the sum of $47,142.17. 



Water from Metropolitan Water Works Sources used Outside of the 

Metropolitan Water District 



Places Supplied 


Total 
Quantity 
(Gallons) 


Average 
Quantity 
(Gallons 
per Day) 


Amount 
Charged 


Town of Rutland ....... 

Town of Holden ....... 

Town of Clinton ....... 

Westborough State Hospital ..... 

Town of Westborough ...... 

Town of Ashland ....... 

Town of Framingham ...... 

Town of Natick ....... 

United States Army Reservation at Peddock's Island in Hull 
Portion of Town of Braintree ..... 

Portion of Town of Winchester ..... 

Portion of Town of Saugus ..... 




93,600,000 
22,900,000 ' 
35,600,000 
91,810,000 
66,000,000 
41,975,000 > 
511,043,900 
265,790,000 
26,255,000 - 
232,000 » 
333,000 4 
20,000 s 


256,400 

62,700 

97,500 

252,000 

180,800 

115,000 

1,400,100 

728,200 

71,900 

636 

912 

55 


2,754 30 

20,441 76 
1,709 69 



Note. — Water is used throughout the year in all places except the town of Clinton, which took water on 
68 days and a portion of the town of Saugus which was supplied for 65 days. The average daily use is in 
all cases figured on basis of 365 days. 

1 Not diverted from watersheds. 

2 The city of Quincy supplies the water at regular rates and turns over one-half of the receipts to the 
Commonwealth. 

3 The city of Quincy supplies the water at regular rates and pays the Commonwealth by an addition to 
its regular apportionment. 

* The town of Arlington supplies the water at regular rates and pays the Commonwealth by an addition 
to its regular apportionment. 

5 The city of Melrose supplies the water at regular rates and pays the Commonwealth by an addition to 
its regular apportionment. 



26 P.D. 48 

Information regarding the installation of meters on service pipes by the mu- 
nicipalities supplied with water from the Metropolitan Water Works for the year 
1927 and other statistics are given in tables in the Appendix. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM E. FOSS, 
Boston, January 2, 1928. Director and Chief Engineer. 



REPORT OF DIRECTOR AND CHIEF ENGINEER 

OF SEWERAGE DIVISION 

Davis B. Keniston, Commissioner, Metropolitan District Commission. 

Dear Sir : — The following report of the operations of the Metropolitan Sewer- 
age Works for the year ending December 31, 1927, is respectfully submitted: 

Organization 

The Director and Chief Engineer has charge of the design and construction of 
all new works, and of the maintenance and operation of all the works controlled 
by the Metropolitan District Commission for removing sewage from the twenty- 
seven municipalities which comprise the Metropolitan Sewerage Districts. 

The following assistants have been employed during the year : 

Henry T. Stiff, Associate Civil Engineer, in charge of office and drafting room and 

of the construction work. 
Charles F. Fitz, Assistant Civil Engineer, in charge of maintenance studies and of 

maintenance construction work on the North Metropolitan System. 
Ralph W. Loud, Assistant Civil Engineer, in charge of survey work and field work 

in connection with the Mill Brook Valley Sewer construction, Belmont Relief 

Sewer construction and New Mystic Valley Sewer construction. 
Arthur F. F. Haskell, Superintendent, North Metropolitan Sewerage District. . 
Frank B. Williams, Superintendent, South Metropolitan Sewerage District. 

In addition to the above, the maximum number of engineering and other assist- 
ants employed during the year was 11, which includes 2 instrumentmen, 2 inspec- 
tors, 1 draftsman, 4 rodmen and engineering assistants and 2 stenographers. 

METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE DISTRICTS 

Areas and Populations 

During the year no changes have been made in the extent of the metropolitan 
sewerage districts. 

The populations of the districts, as given in the following table, are based on the 
census of 1925. 



Metropolitan Park System — December 1, 1927. 









Reservations (Aciies). 


Paukwayb (Acices). 


11 
o a 

o 


Parkways (Miles). 










S 


1 

■a 
3 


m 
>> 

a 

s 

09 


n 

> 
n 


1 

s 


is 

l 


s 

8 
J 

5 


> 

B 

a 


> 

s 

1 

a 

a 


■a 

09 


§ 

I 


03 

| 

a 


CO 

1 

a 


i 

« 

1 

a 

1 


< 

3 


1 


o 

9- 


3 


J3 
8 

I 


3 
> 

t 

53 


| 
1 
1 


> 

i 

a 
1 


T3 

I 


a 

I 


1 


.a 

s 

« 

a 
.3 

55 




§ 

-a 
5 


1 

a 

cfl 

O 

i 


1 


d 

| 

a 


1 

a 


8 

1 
3 


i 
< 


3 

m 
s 


i 


1 


J3 

n 

s 

1 


> 


1 


* 

> 
M 

a 
1 


a 

<S 

XI 

1 


I 


A 
8 
ffl 

a 
a 

1 


.4 

i 
1 


•a 

a 

a 
1 

| 

n 


>> 

1 

■a 
O 


o 

a 
a 
$ 


1 


a 
| 
a 


i 
i 


1 

5 


i 

■s, 
3 




1 

2 
3 
4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 

15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 

28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 


Cities. 

Boston, 

Cambrideo, 

Chelsea, 

Everett, . 

Lynn, 

Maiden, 

Medford, . 

Melrose, 

Newton, . 

Quincy, 

Revere, 

Somervillo, 

Waltham, . 

Woburn, 

Towns, 
Arlington, . 
Belmont, . 
Brain tree, . 
Brookline, . 
Canton, 
Cohasaot, . 
Dedham, . 
Dover, 
Hingham, . 
Hull, . 
Milton, 
Nabant, 
Needham, . 
I Randolph], 
Saugua, 
Stoneham, 
Swampscott, 
Wakefield, . 
Watertown, 
Wellealey, . 
Weston, 
Westwood, 
Weymouth, 
Winchester, 
Winthrop, . 




6.05 


2,562-57 

67 81 
471.34 

1,547.68 
257.00 


69.53 
949 69 
177.54 

702.80 
261.93 


403 72 


42.77 


- 


4.24 

14.24 
4.58 


109.10 

223 74 

183.65 
38.08 

78.79 
06 07 
124.79 


42 32 


146 89 

264. 20 
234.54 

269.30 
6.57 


19.69 






3201 


25.69 


785.82 
223.74 

19.59 
59.63 
992 01 
177.54 
187.79 
2,595.48 
04.29 
4 03 
81.45 

7.83 
15.50 
07.84 

735.60 

234.54 

25.59 
1,81094 

14 24 
257.00 

702.80 
3.10 
22.07 
78.79 
70.06 
124.79 
0.57 

291 .03 
10.83 


.27 
83.31 


.60 


44 56 
13 98 


8 10 
66.31 


265.34 
4.05 

60.20 


75 65 


22 70 
51.16 




.15 


101 14 


81.66 




50 75 

2-72 


16.54 


5.15 


8 61 
.13 


21.98 
15 16 


80.33 

07 

28.10 
20.43 


171.41 
98.78 
21.16 
31.10 
.32 
23.58 

318.00 
14.40 

114.50 

103.811 
80.07 
28.90 

22.64 

45 50 
29.43 

70. IS 
15 10 

131.17 
81.69 

15.43 
.15 

15.54 

50.80 
.13 


957.23 
322,52 

2i. in 

31.16 
19.91 
83.11 
1,310.01 
191.94 

2,699.34 
144.36 
32.93 

22.64 

63.33 
35.99 

79.18 

249.70 

25.59 

1,951.45 

81.66 

14.24 

257.00 

15.43 

702.05 

3.10 

38.51 

78.79 

70-65 

124.70 

6.57 

312.73 
10.90 


.015 
2.250 


1.31 
.07 


2 850 
.740 


.814 
1.662 

.482 


4.45 
.38 

1 7S0 


1.810 


.72 
1.540 


.620 


1.716 
.060 


4.320 


2.230 




2.70 

.36 


-774 


,120 

.570 


.88 
.02 


.49 


1-563 

.303 

.848 
.473 


6.735 
2.083 

.814 
1.662 

.120 
1-615 
7,782 
1.856 
1.200 
4-680 
3.745 
1.423 

1.310 

2.248 
.473 

1.60 

3.790 
2.230 

1.716 
.060 

.774 

1850 
.020 


1 

2 
3 

4 
6 

7 
8 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 

1.'. 
10 
17 
18 
U 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
20 
27 

2 b 
29 

30 
31 
32 

33 
34 
15 

30 
.37 
3? 








6.05 


4,906.43 


2,151.49 


463.72 


(8.33 


22.97 


23.0G 


884.78 


64 18 


921.60 


22.69 


64.29 


16.83 


32.01 


25.59 


0,051.88 


83.58 


23.24 


82.12 


120.73 


337.89 


85.04 


73.92 


12.40 


29.98 


101.14 


81.93 


183 69 


63.47 


15.54 


6.15 


8 74 


37.14 


114.88 


1.4S7.23 


11,142.11 


2-265 


1.38 


5.105 


5.253 


8.01 


2 01 


2.260 


.520 


3.632 


4320 


2.230 


2 00 


3 06 


.774 


.690 


.90 


.08 


3.187 


49.176 





P.D. 48 



27 



Table showing Ultimate Contributing Areas and Present Estimated Populations 
within the Metropolitan Sevjerage Districts, as of December 31, 1927. 



City or Town 


Area (Square Miles) 


Estimated Population 




r Arlington 


5.20 


27,370 




Belmont 












4.66 


16,990 




Boston (portions c 


)f) 










3.45 


105,600 




Cambridge . 












6.11 


125,070 


£ 


Chelsea . 












2.24 


48,720 


c3 


Everett 












3.34 


42,830 


•I— 1 

o 


Lexington 1 . 












5.11 


5,370 


O o 


Maiden . 












5.07 


52,960 


-t-5 s- 


Medford 












8.35 


51,520 




Melrose . 












3.73 


21,130 


Reading 












9.82 


9,250 




Revere . 












5.86 


35,380 


O 


Somerville 












3.96 


102,160 


K 


Stoneham 
Wakefield . 
Winchester . 
Winthrop 
Woburn 












5.50 
7.65 
5.95 
1.61 
12.71 


9,570 
16,240 
12,060 
17,100 

18,980 












ion °l° 


71 9 °Ofl 




±\j\j . o6 


1 lOjOUU 


fi 


' Boston (portions of) 










24.96 


323,030 


o3 


Brookline 










6.81 


44,960 


f— * 

o 


Dedham l 














9.40 


14,050 


O C3 


Milton . 














12.59 


14,020 


■*^ J5 -< 


Newton . 














16.88 


56,670 


^.23 


Quincy . 














12.56 


65,320 


Waltham 














13.63 


35,970 


^3 


Watertown 














4.04 


27,340 


3 

o 


Wellesley 














9.89 


9,590 


GO 


Needham 














12.50 


9,530 




lOQ Op. 


fion ^ 90 




\.LsO . S.\J 


UUU, TcOU 




Totals 














223.58 


1,318,780 



1 Part of town. 



METROPOLITAN SEWERS 

Sewers Purchased and Constructed and Their Connections 

During the year there has been 0.730 mile of Metropolitan sewers built within 
the sewerage districts, so that there are now 123.700 miles of Metropolitan sewers. 
Of this total, 9.642 miles of sewers, with the Quincy Pumping Station, have been 
purchased from cities and towns of the districts. The remaining 114.058 miles of 
sewers and other works have been constructed by the Metropolitan Boards. 

The locations, lengths and sizes of these sewers are given in the following tables, 
together with other data referring to the public and special connections with the 
systems : 



28 P.D. 48 

North Metropolitan Sewerage System 
Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections 







to 


i i 

w a 

a, a 


S fecial Connections 










a s N 










= ~ 


City or Town 


Size of Sewers 


a 


-H 




• m* "* 






-C 


t»« 


Character or Location 










•a O m 


of Connection 


•2 t 






O) 


3^ 




= 5 






j 


Oh 




£ 


Boston: 












Deer Island 


4' 0" to 9' 0" 


1 . 653 


4 


- - - 


- 








26 { 

1 


Shoe factory 




East Boston 


9' 0" to V 0" 


5.467 


Middlebrook Wool-combing 
Co. ... 

Navy Yard 
Private building . 




Charlestown 


6' 7" x 7' 5" to 1' 0" . 


3.292 


,( 


9 




, 




14 1 


Club House 




Winthrop 


9'0" 


2.804 


Fire department station 












Private building . 










' 


Bakery 












Rendering Works 












Metropolitan Water Works 




Chelsea 


8' 4" x 9' 2" to 15" 


5 . 230 


14 

| 


blow-off .... 

Chelsea Water Works blow- 
offs .... 

Naval Hospital . 

U. S. Lighthouse Service 

Metropolitan Water Works 
blow-off .... 

Cameron Appliance Co. 

Shultz-Goodwin Co. 


2 


Everett 


8' 2" x 8' 10" to 4' 8" x 5' 1" 


2.925 


9 


Andrews-Wasgatt Co. , 
National Metallic Bed Co. . 
Linoide Co. 

Factory .... 
New England Structural Co. 
Beacon Oil Co. 




Lexington ' 


1'3" 


— 


1 


Metropolitan Water Works 




Maiden 


4' 6" x 4' 10" to 1' 0" . 


5 . 844 2 


35' 


blow-off .... 
Private buildings 


231 3 










Private buildings 


1315 


Melrose 


4' 6" x 4' 10" to 10" 


6.099* 


41- 


Factory 

Railroad station . 

Park Department bath-house 

Harvard dormitories 

Slaughterhouse 




Cambridge 


5' 2" x 5' 9" to 1' 3" ... 


7.879 


50 • 


City Hospital 

Street Railway machine shop 

Private building . 

Factory building . 

Tannery .... 

Slaughterhouses (3) 

Carhouse 

Somerville Water Works blow- 




Somerville 


6' 5" x 7' 2'' to 10" 


3 . 577 


15- 


off 

Street railway power house . 
Stable .... 
Rendering works 
Railroad scale pit 
Private building . 





1 The Metropolitan Sewer extends but a few feet into the town of Lexington. 

2 Includes 1.84 miles of sewer purchased from the city of Maiden. 

3 Mostly buildings connected with sewers formerly belonging to city of Maiden but later purchased by the 
Metropolitan Sewerage Commission in accordance with Chapter 215 of the Acts of 1898 and by the Metro- 
politan Water and Sewerage Board in accordance with Chapter 512 of the Acts of 1911 and made parts of 
the North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 

4 Includes ' .736 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Melrose. 

5 Mostly buildings connected with a sewer formerly belonging to the city of Melrose but later purchased 
by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission in accordance with Chapter 414 of the Acts of 1896 and with 
a sewer extension built in accordance with Chapter 436 of the Acts of 1897 by the Metropolitan Sewerage 
Commission as an outlet for part of the town of Stoneham and made parts of the North Metropolitan 
Sewerage System. 



P.D. 48 



29 



North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Concluded 
Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections — Con. 







CO 




Special Connections 








% 


§3$ 
















a 


o«^ 




«S 


City or Town 


Size of Sewers 


• ^* 


i— i 




— .2 






r* 


cc^OO 


Character or Location 


cd rt 






M 

C 


ublic 
tior 
ber 


of Connection 


5 a 
£0 






1-1 


Ph 




z 








,' 


Armory building . 


1 


Medford 


4' 8" x 5' 1" to 10" 


6.326 


26 < 


Private buildings 
Stable . . 
Police substation 


9 
1 
1 










Tanneries .... 


6 










Private buildings 
Gelatine factory . 
Watch-hand factory 
Stable .... 


12 
1 
1 
1 


Winchester 


4' 6" to V 3" 


10.420 


32 < 


Railroad station . 
Felt works .... 
Town Hall .... 
Bay State Saw & Tool Co. . 
Whitney Machine Co. . 
Metropolitan Sewerage Divi- 
sion .... 


2 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 


Stoneham 


V 8" to 10" .... 


2.333 


6 


_ _ _ 


- 


Woburn 


2' 6" x 2' 7" to V 3" . 


1.186 


3 


Glue factory ... 
Private building 
Private buildings 
Railroad station . 


4 

1 

215 2 

1 










Car house .... 


3 


Arlington 


3' 0" x 3' 6" to 10" 


5.346' 


61 • 


Post office .... 
Town of Arlington garage 
The Theodore Schwamb Co., 
Inc. .... 
Arlington Gas Light Co. 


1 

1 

1 
1 


Belmont 


1' 3" to 2' 6" 


0.008 


5 


_ _ _ 


— 


Wakefield 


3' 0" to 2' 0"x 2' 3" 


0.703 


1 


_ _ _ 


- 


Revere . 


4' 0" to 15" .... 


0.136 


3 


_ _ _ 


- 


Reading 


1' 4" to 3' 0" 


0.055 


1 




• ... 




71.843 3 


361 


684 



1 Includes 2.631 miles of sewer purchased from the town of Arlington. 

2 Mostly buildings connected with a sewer formerly belonging to the town of Arlington but later pur- 
chased by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission in accordance with Chapter 520 of the Acts of 1897 and 
made a part of the North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 

3 Includes 2.787 miles of Mystic Valley Sewer in Medford and Winchester, running parallel with the 
Metropolitan Sewer. 

South Metropolitan Sewerage System 
Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections 





Size of Sewers 


m 
<u 
»— » 
• •-< 

a 

a 
►4 


Public Connec- 
tions, Decem- 
ber 31, 1927 


Special Connections 


City or Town 


Character or Location 
of Connection 


Number in 
Operation 


Boston: 

Back Bay . 

Brighton 


6' 6" to 3' 9" 

5' 9" x 6' 0" to 12" 


1 . 500 ' 
6.010 2 


r 
16 

15< 


Tufts Medical School . 

Private house 

Administration Building, Bos- 
ton Park Department 

Simmons College Buildings . 

Art Museum 

Prince District Elementary 
School .... 

Private building . 

Abbatoir .... 


3 



1 Includes 0.355 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

2 Includes 0.446 of a mile of pipe and concrete sewers built for the use of the city of Boston; also 0.026 
of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 



30 P.D. 48 

South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Concluded 
Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections — Con . 







03 

4> 


i i 

03 c 


Special Connections 






Size of Sewers 


•P4 


i—i 






City or Town 




.a © 






J3 


to CO 

f 1 f— 


Character or Location 


Urn ~*~* 

&> 33 






C 

03 


•2/3 .£) 


of Connection 


SO 






h5 


£ 




£ 








' 


Chocolate works . 


2 










Machine shop 


1 


Dorchester 


3' x 4' to 2' 6" x 2' 7" . 


2.870' 


14 < 


Paper Mill . 
Private buildings 
Edison Electric Company Sta- 
tion 
Mattapan Paper Mills . 


1 
3 

1 

2 


Hyde Park 


10'7"xll'7"to4'0"x4'l" . 


4.527 


19- 


Private buildings 

Fairview Cemetery buildings. 


2 
1 


Roxbury 


6' 6" x 7' to 4' 0" . 


1.430 


— 


— _ _ 


— 










Caledonia Grove buildings . 


1 


West Roxbury 


9' 3" x 10' 2" to 12" 


7.643 


20 < 


Parental School . 

Lutheran Evangelical Church 

Private buildings 


1 
1 
6 


Brookline 


6' 6" x 7' 0" to 8" 


2.540 2 


14 


Private buildings 


2 


Dedham 


4' x 4' 1" to 2' 9" x 3' . 


5.012 


!< 


Private buildings 
Dedham Carpet Mills . 


2 

1 


Hull 3 . 


60" pipe .... 


0.750 




_ _ _ 


— 


Milton . 


11' x 12' to 8" 


3.600 


29 


Private buildings 


3 


Newton 


4' 2" x 4' 9" to 1' 3" . 


2.911 


10 { 


Private houses 

Laundry 

Metropolitan Water Works 


13 
1 


Quincy . 


11' 3" x 12' 6" to 24" pipe 


7.392 


22 


blow-off .... 
Squantum schoolhouse 


1 
1 


Waltham 


3' 6" x 4' 0" 


0.001 


1 


_ _ _ 


— 








.( 


Private building . 


1 


Watertown 


4' 2" x 4' 9" to 12" 


0.750^ 


Factories .... 
Stanley Motor Carriage Co. . 


2 
1 










Knights of Pythias building . 


1 


Needham 


2' 0" x 2' 3" to 2' 3" x 2' 6" . 


4.921 


1 


Walker-Gordon Co. 
Private building . 


1 
1 


Wellesley 6 


2' 0" x 2' 3" 


— 


1 




— 




51.857 


178 


64 



1 Includes 1.24 miles of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

2 Includes 0.158 of a mile of pipe sewer built for the use of the town of Brookline. 

3 Hull is not a part of the Metropolitan Sewerage District. 

4 Includes 0.025 of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 

6 The Metropolitan Sewer extends but a few feet into the town of Wellesley. 



Information relating to areas, populations, local sewer connections and other 
data for the Metropolitan sewerage districts appears in the following table : 

North Metropolitan Sewerage District 



Area 

(Square 

Miles) 



100.32 



123.26 



223 . 58 



Estimated 

Total 
Population 



718,300 



600,480 



1,318,780 



Miles of 

Local Sewer 

Connected 



899.51 



Estimated 

Population 

Contributing 

Sewage 



667,190 



Ratio of 

Contributing 

Population 

to Total 
Population 
(Per Cent) 



92.9 



South Metropolitan Sewerage District 



823.46 



475,430 



79.2 



Both Metropolitan Sewerage Districts 



1,722.97 



1,142,620 



86.6 



Connections made 
with Metropolitan 

Sewers 



Public 



361 



Special 



684 



178 



64 



539 



748 



POPULATION , CONSUMPTION OF WATER and per CENT OF SERVICES METERED 

METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT 
AS SUPPLIED IN 1927 

FROM 1890 TO 1927 

































'* 




1 


































































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Note : Estimated population and consumption per capita given on diagram published in annual reports 1916 to 1924 
inclusive have been revised and are here shown in accordance with 1925 census. 



P.D. 48 31 

Of the estimated gross population of 1,318,780 on December 31, 1927, 1,142,620, 
representing 86.6 per cent, were on that date contributing sewage to the Metropoli- 
tan sewers, through a total length of 1,722.97 miles of local sewers owned by the 
individual cities and towns of the districts. 

These sewers are connected with the Metropolitan Systems by 539 public and 
748 special connections. During the current year there has been an increase of 
53.02 miles of local sewers connected with the Metropolitan Systems, and 17 
public and 33 special connections have been added. 

CONSTRUCTION 

NORTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM 

Mill Brook Valley Sewer — Arlington 

The construction work authorized by Chapter 116 of the Acts of 1924 in the 
Mill Brook Valley, Arlington, North Metropolitan Sewerage System, described 
in former reports, has been completed and the sewers are now in operation. 

Belmont Relief Sewer — Section 81 

Chapter 213 of the Acts of 1926 authorized the construction of an additiona 
main sewer from the Belmont line to the Alewife Brook Valley Sewer of the North 
Metropolitan Sewerage System in Cambridge. This work is known as Section 81, 
Belmont Relief Sewer of the North Metropolitan Sewerage System. Surveys 
were made and a contract let for the construction of the same, as described in 
last year's report. Work was started on this section March 11, 1927, and was car- 
ried on to completion and the line was put in operation November 15, 1927. This 
work extends wholly in lands of the Boston and Maine Railroad. Considerable 
ground water was encountered. A pile foundation extends from Station 18+04 to 
Station 25+92. 

Malden, Revere and Everett Drainage System 

Chapter 456 of the Acts of 1924 directed the Metropolitan District Commission 
to construct a drainage channel to improve a low area lying in the cities of Mai- 
den, Revere and Everett. Surveys and land takings were completed and work 
was started on construction plans and field work on July 12, 1926. A temporary 
injunction by the Supreme Court was placed on the further carrying on of this 
work which ceased for the present on July 28, 1926, pending the decision of the 
Court on the question before it. 

The Court has not yet rendered a decision. 

New Mystic Valley Sewer 

Chapter 184 of the Acts of 1927 authorized an extension of the New M}rstic 
Valley main sewer, North Metropolitan Sewerage System, from its present termi- 
nus near Grove Street in Medford to Prescott Street in Medford. Surveys for 
this work have been completed and contract plans are nearly ready. Construc- 
tion work will start early in 1928. 

MAINTENANCE 

Scope of Work and Force Employed 

The maintenance of the Metropolitan Sewerage System includes the operation 
of 8 pumping stations, the Nut Island screen-house and 123.700 miles of Metropoli- 
tan sewers, receiving the discharge from 1,722.97 miles of town and city sewers at 
539 points, together with the care and study of inverted siphons under streams 
and in the harbor. 

At present the permanent maintenance force consists of 174 men, of whom 108 
are employed on the North System and 66 on the South System. These are sub- 



32 P.D. 48 

divided as follows: North Metropolitan System, 67 engineers and other employees 
in the pumping stations and 41 men, including foremen, on maintenance, care of 
sewer lines, buildings and grounds; South Metropolitan System, 41 engineers and 
other employees in the pumping stations and 25 men, including foremen, on 
maintenance, care of sewer lines, buildings and grounds. 

The regular work of this department, in addition to the operation of the pump- 
ing stations, has consisted of routine work of cleaning and inspecting sewers and 
siphons, caring for tide gates, outfall sewers, regulators and overflows, measuring 
flow in sewers, inspection of connections to the Metropolitan sewers, and the care 
of pumping stations and other buildings, grounds and wharves. 

In addition to these regular duties, other work has been done by the mainte- 
nance employees in this department as follows : 

East Boston Pumping Station 

The original cast-iron salt-water injection pipe for engines numbered 1, 2 and 3 
in this station was placed in 1894. This had become so badly corroded that it 
was necessary to replace it entirely. This was done by means of an 8-inch cast- 
iron pipe which was placed in the gallery underneath the main floor. 

The low pressure cylinder on Engine No. 2 was overhauled and new metallic 
gaskets and rings were installed. 

The grease well at the East Boston end of the Chelsea River siphon was cleaned 
and a new diaphragm was put in place. 

Deer Island Pumping Station 

The copper on the roofs at the Deer Island Pumping Station, coal pockets and 
screen-house had become so badly corroded that it was necessary to make an 
entire renewal. This was done with 24-ounce copper. The work included renewal 
of gutters, crickets, flashings, down-spouts, cupola covering, valleys and ridges. 

The allowable pressure in the two 60-inch horizontal tubular boilers installed in 
1899 at this station had been reduced by the Boiler Inspection Department to 
such an extent that the boilers were no longer capable of operating the station. 
These were removed and two new 72-inch boilers of horizontal type were furnished 
and installed by the D. M. Dillon Steam Boiler Works of Fitchburg. 

The bridge leading from the Metropolitan Sewerage wharf to the Deer Island 
shore was constructed in 1892. The coal run which rested on this bridge was 
constructed in 1895. These had become so badly rotted that it was necessary 
to replace them with new work. This was done by the William L. Miller Com- 
pany who furnished the labor. Material was furnished by the Commission. 

Charlestown Pumping Station 

The allowable pressure in the horizontal tubular boilers numbered 1 and 2, 
originally installed in 1894, was so reduced by the Boiler Inspection Department 
that the boilers could no longer operate the station. These were removed and 
two new boilers similar in type and size, built by the International Engineering 
Works of Framingham, were installed in their place. 

The Sturtevant economizer at this station had become so badly corroded that 
it was necessary to make a replacement. This was done by a Green economizer 
of similar type and capacity. 

Alewife Brook Pumping Station 

A new Reilly feed water heater was installed at this station. 

No. 2 boiler in this station was retubed throughout. 

One of the original 4,000,000 gallon pumping units at this station has been 
replaced by a Morris centrifugal pump and cross-compound vertical engine. The 
capacity of the new unit is 8,000,000 gallons per day. 



P.D. 48 33 

Nut Island Screen-House 

In addition to the regular maintenance work at the Nut Island Screen-house and 
at the Hough's Neck Pumping Station, the employees of this station have made 
5,508 lbs. of brass castings for the different pumping stations of the Sewerage 
System. A large amount of expert machine work has been done here for other 
stations. 

Gasolene in Public Sewers 

During the year the usual precautions have been maintained against the intro- 
duction of gasolene into the Metropolitan sewers. An inspector who covers both 
North and South Metropolitan Sewerage Districts has been employed. His duties 
are to see that all newly constructed garages or other gasolene using establish- 
ments are supplied with a proper gasolene separator and also to see that these 
separators are kept in working condition. 

During the year 1927 the number of permits issued by the municipalities in the 
Sewerage Districts for the construction of garages and other places where gaso- 
lene is used was 840. Each of these permits necessitates an examination by our 
inspector. Many of them are attended to through the mails and do not require 
a personal visit. Visits are made, however, to all locations where a connection 
is to be made with the public sewerage system and to such places as do not re- 
spond to the return postal cards sent out. During the year 42 such places were 
connected with the sewers that empty into the Metropolitan Systems. At the 
present time, there are, according to our records, 1,470 garages and other estab- 
lishments where gasolene is used connected with the local sewerage systems which 
discharge into the Metropolitan sewers. 

This system of inspection has improved the gasolene situation in regard to the 
danger to the sewers. Occasionally odors of gasolene are detected in the sewers. 
These are reported to the Public Safety Department which alone has statutory 
control of the distribution and handling of gasolene in the Commonwealth. 



34 



P.D. 48 



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P.D. 48 37 

PUMPING STATIONS 

Capacities and Results 

North Metropolitan System 
Deer Island Pumping Station 

At this station are four submerged centrifugal pumps with impeller wheels 
8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion engines of the Reynolds-Corliss 
type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 100,000,000 gallons, with 19-foot lift. 
Contract capacity of 3 pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 
Average coal duty for the year: 55,000,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 84,000,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 150,700,000 gallons. 

East Boston Pumping Station 

At this station are four submerged centrifugal pumps, with impeller wheels 
8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion engines of the Reynolds-Corliss 
type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 100,000,000 gallons with 19-foot lift. 
Contract capacity of 3 pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 
Average coal duty for the year: 76,800,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 82,000,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 148,700,000 gallons. 

Charlestown Pumping Station 

At this station are three submerged centrifugal pumps, two of them having 
impeller wheels 7.5 feet in diameter, the other 8.25 feet in diameter. They are 
driven by triple-expansion engines of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 60,000,000 gallons with 8-foot lift. 
Contract capacity of 2 pumps: 22,000,000 gallons each, with 11-foot lift. 
Average coal duty for the year: 50,800,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 46,700,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 69,400,000 gallons. 

Alewife Brook Pumping Station 

One of the 9-inch Andrews centrifugal pumps was removed during the year and 
a Morris pump and engine was put in its place. 

The pumping units in this station now consist of one Andrews pump driven by 
a compound marine engine, one Morris pump and Morris compound engine and a 
specially designed engine of vertical cross-compound type having between the 
cylinders a centrifugal pump rotating on a horizontal axis. 

Contract capacity of the Andrews pump: 4,500,000 gallons with 13-foot lift. 
Contract capacity of Morris pump: 8,000,000 gallons with 15-foot lift. 
Contract capacity of the special pump: 13,000,000 gallons with 13-foot lift. 
Average coal duty for the year: 23,100,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 5,800,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 11,410,000 gallons. 

Reading Pumping Station 

At this station are two submerged centrifugal pumps, one of 2,500,000 gallons per 
24 hours, and one of 4,000,000 gallons per 24 hours, capacity. These operate 
against a maximum head of 65 feet, and are actuated by vertical shafts directly 



38 P.D. 48 

connected with 75 and 100 horsepower motors. Alternating current of 440 volts 
furnished by the town of Reading is used. 

Average quantity pumped per 24 hours: 833,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 1,000,000 gallons. 

South Metropolitan System. 

Ward Street Pumping Station 

At this station are two vertical, triple-expansion pumping engines, of the Allis- 
Chalmers type, operating reciprocating pumps, the plungers of which are 48 inches 
in diameter with a 60-inch stroke and one 50,000,000-gallon centrifugal pumping 
unit actuated by a 500 H.P. Uniflow engine. 

Contract capacity of 3 pumps: 50,000,000 gallons each, with 45-foot lift. 
Average coal duty for the year: 78,300,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 37,300,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 57,220,000 gallons. 

Quincy Pumping Station 

The plant at this station consists of one compound condensing Deane duplex 
piston pumping unit and one Lawrence centrifugal pump driven by a Sturtevant 
compound condensing engine and one Morris centrifugal pump driven by a Morris 
compound condensing engine. 

Contract capacity of 3 pumps: Morris centrifugal, 10,000,000 gallons; Deane, 

5,000,000 gallons; Lawrence centrifugal, 10,000,000 gallons. 
Average coal duty for the year: 33,800,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 7,245,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 18,800,000 gallons. 

Nut Island Screen-house 

The plant at this house includes two sets of screens in duplicate actuated by 
small reversing engines of the Fitchburg type. Two vertical Deane boilers, 80 
horsepower each, operate the engines, provide heat and light for the house, burn 
materials intercepted at the screens, and furnish power for the Hough's Neck 
pumping station. 

Average daily quantity of sewage passing screens: 68,200,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity passing screens per day: 162,000,000 gallons. 

Hough's Neck Pumping Station 

At this station are two 6-inch submerged Lawrence centrifugal pumps with 
vertical shafts actuated by two Sturtevant direct-current motors. 

The labor and electric energy for this station are supplied from the Nut Island 
Screen-house, and as used at present it does not materially increase the amount of 
coal used at the latter station. 

Average quantity raised each day: 283,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 483,300 gallons. 



P.D. 48 



39 



Average Daily Volume of Sewage lifted at Each of the Eight Metropolitan Sewerage 
Pumping Stations during the Year, as compared with the Corresponding Vol- 
umes for the Previous Year. 





Average Daily Pumpage 


Pumping Station 


Jan. 1, 1927, 

to Dec. 31, 

1927 


Jan. 1, 1926, 

to Dec. 31, 

1926 


Increase during 
the Year 


Deer Island ....... 

East Boston ...... 

Charlestown . . 

Alewife Brook ...... 

Reading ....... 

Quincy ....... 

Ward Street (actual gallons pumped) 

Hough's Neck ...... 


Gallons 

84,000,000 

82,000,000 

46,700,000 

5,800,000 

833,000 

7,245,000 

37,300,000 

283,000 


Gallons 

79,300,000 

77,300,000 

43,500,000 

5,800,000 

833,000 

6,238,000 

36,200,000 

245,000 


Gallons 
4,700,000 
4,700,000 
3,200,000 

1,007,000 

1,100,000 

38,000 


Per Cent 
5.9 
6.1 
7.4 

16.1 

3.0 

15.5 



Metropolitan Sewerage Outfalls 

The Metropolitan Sewerage Districts now have outfalls in Boston Harbor at 
five points, two of which may discharge sewage from the North District and three 
from the South District. 

During the year the sewage of the North District has been discharged wholly 
through the outlet located near Deer Island light. The other outfall of this sys- 
tem is closed by a cast-iron cover which can easily be removed. 

Of the outfalls of the South District two extend for a distance exceeding one 
mile from the shore of Nut Island, Quincy, and the third one, called an emergency 
outlet, extends about 1,500 feet from the same. It was necessary to discharge 
sewage through this outfall fourteen hours during the year. 

During the year the average flow through the North Metropolitan District 
outfall at Deer Island has been 84,000,000 gallons of sewage per 24 hours, with a 
maximum rate of 150,700,000 gallons during a stormy period in December, 1927. 
The amount of sewage discharged into the North Metropolitan District averaged 126 
gallons per day for each person, taking the estimated population of the District con- 
tributing sewage. If the sewers in this District were restricted to the admission 
of sewage proper only, this per capita amount would be considerably decreased. 

In the South Metropolitan District an average of 68,200,000 gallons of sewage 
per 24 hours has passed through the screens at the Nut Island screen-house and 
has been discharged from the outfalls into the outer harbor. The maximum rate 
of discharge per day which occurred during a stormy period in November, 1927, 
was 162,000,000 gallons. The discharge of sewage through these outfalls repre- 
sents the amount of sewage contributed by the South Metropolitan District, 
which was at the rate of 143 gallons per day per person of the estimated number 
contributing sewage in the District. 

The daily discharge of sewage per capita is considerably larger in the South 
Metropolitan District than it is in the North Metropolitan District, because owing 
to the large size and unused capacity of the South District High-level Sewer, 
more storm water is at present admitted to the sewers of this District. 

Material Intercepted at the Screens 

The material removed from the sewage at the screens of the North Metropolitan 
Sewerage Stations, consisting of rags, paper and other floating materials, has 
during the year amounted to 1,933 cubic yards. This is equivalent to 1.70 cubic 
feet for each million gallons of sewage pumped at Deer Island. 

The material removed from the sewage at the screens of the South Metropolitan 
Sewerage Stations amounted to 4,367 cubic yards, equal to 4.74 cubic feet per 
million gallons of sewage delivered at the outfall works at Nut Island. 

Studies of sewage flows in the Metropolitan sewers and siphons indicate that 
they are free from deposit. 

FREDERICK D. SMITH, 
Director and Chief Engineer of Sewerage Division. 

Boston, January 1, 1928. 



40 P.D. 48 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

OF THE 

METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION 

For the Year ending November 30, 1927 



PARKS DIVISION 
Construction 

METROPOLITAN PARKS CONSTRUCTION FUND 

Total amount authorized to Dec. 1, 1926 $9,093,043 96 

Receipts added before June 1, 1901 198,942 81 

$9,291,986 77 
Expenditures 
Middlesex Fells Reservation: 

Land $100 00 

Legal: 

Services $21 43 

Expenses 4 47 

25 90 

$125 90 

Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1926 9,263,478 03 

9,263,603 93 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $28,382 84 

METROPOLITAN PARKS CONSTRUCTION FUND, SERIES II 

Total amount authorized to Dec. 1, 1926 $9,417,749 63 

Receipts from sales, etc 29,934 16 

$9,447,683 79 
Expenditures 
Quannapowitt Parkway: 
Construction: 

Contract, Greenough Const. Co $4,000 00 

Land 2,176 40 

Legal: 

Services $22 87 

Expenses 5 62 

28 49 

$6,204 89 

Middlesex Fells Parkway: 
Construction: 

Contract, Coleman Bros 15,494 22 

Neponset Bridge: 
Engineering: 

Expenses 275 47 

$21,974 58 
Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1926 9,374,641 93 

9,396,616 51 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $51,067 28 

CHARLES RIVER BASIN CONSTRUCTION FUND 

Total amount authorized to Dec. 1, 1926 $4,500,000 00 

Receipts to Dec. 1, 1926 9,368 91 

$4,509,368 91 
Expenditures 

Bond book $60 00 

Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1926 4,472,862 22 

4,472,922 22 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $36,446 69 

NANTASKET BEACH CONSTRUCTION FUND 

Total amount authorized to Dec. 1, 1926 $700,000 00 

Receipts to Dec. 1, 1926 5,881 50 

$705,8S1 50 

Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1926 $705,881 50 



P.D. 48 41 

NORTH BEACON STREET BRIDGE CONSTRUCTION FUND 
Total amount authorized to Dec. 1, 1926 $175,000 00 

Expenditures 

Transfer to Serial Bond Loan $146 50 

Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1926 174,853 50 

$175,000 00 

MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE BRIDGE CONSTRUCTION FUND 
Total amount authorized to Dec. 1, 1926 $600,000 00 

Expenditures 

Interest $0 69 

Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1926 522,296 56 

522,297 25 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $77,702 75 

NORTHERN TRAFFIC ROUTE CONSTRUCTION FUND 

Total amount authorized to Dec. 1, 1926 $2,400,000 00 

Chap. 315, Acts of 1927 550,000 00 

$2,950,000 00 

Expenditures 
Construction: 
Contracts: 

Bay State Dredging & Cont. Co. . $24,242 70 

Coleman Bros 339,363 13 

James H. Fannon 76,779 42 

$440,385 25 

Labor and materials 25,776 32 

$466,161 57 

Land 56,401 80 

Engineering: 

Services $24,329 46 

Supplies and expenses 888 55 

25,218 01 

Legal: 

Services $1,692 31 

Expenses 74 29 

1,766 60 

Claims 1,425 50 

Advertising bids 42 95 

Printing contracts, etc. . 144 72 

$551,161 15 
Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1926 1,785,336 61 

2,336,497 76 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $613,502 24 

BROOKLINE STREET, ESSEX STREET, COTTAGE FARM BRIDGE CONSTRUCTION FUND 

Total amount authorized to Dec. 1, 1926 $1,300,000 00 

Chap. 320, Acts of 1927 250,000 00 

$1,550,000 00 

Expenditures 
Construction: 
Contracts: 

T. Stuart & Sons Co $785,341 19 

J. F. White Cont. Co 4,832 86 

$790,174 05 

Labor and materials 29,066 17 

$819,240 22 

Engineering: 

Services $16,595 04 

Supplies and expenses 7,438 09 

. 24,033 13 

Legal: 

Services $18 21 

Expenses 10 00 

28 21 

Claims 250 00 

Interest 5,521 84 

$849,073 40 

Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1926 103,837 49 

1,012,910 89 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $437,089 11 



42 P.D. 48 

WESTERN AVENUE, ARSENAL STREET BRIDGE CONSTRUCTION FUND 
Total amount authorized to Dec. 1, 1926 $200,000 00 

Expenditures 
Engineering: 

Supplies and expenses . $209 69 

Interest 17 



$209 86 
Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1926 192,760 94 



192,970 80 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $7,029 20 

WESTERN AVENUE BRIDGE CONSTRUCTION FUND 
Total amount authorized to Dee. 1, 1926 . $325,000 00 

Expenditures 
Construction: 

Labor and materials $2,014 60 

Interest 42 



$2,015 02 
Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1926 303,082 93 



305,097 95 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $19,902 05 

RIVER STREET, BRIGHTON STREET BRIDGE CONSTRUCTION FUND 

Total amount authorized to Dec. 1, 1926 $300,000 00 

Chapter 320, Acts of 1927 10,000 00 



Expenditures 
Interest 19,246 75 



$310,000 00 



Construction: 

Labor and materials $3,024 95 



eoo 271 70 
Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1926 282^413 47 



304,685 17 
Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $5,314 83 

NEWTON-WELLESLEY BRIDGE CONSTRUCTION FUND 

Appropriation (Chapter 283, Acts of 1927) $50,000 00 

Receipts for year ending Nov. 30, 1927 . 670 77 



Expenditures 
Construction: 
Contract: 

C. & R. Const. Co $18,297 09 

Labor and materials 213 94 



$50,670 77 



Engineering: 

Services $3,268 21 

Supplies 2,439 14 



$18,511 03 



5,707 35 



Advertising 107 55 

Printing contracts, etc 11381 



24,439 74 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $26,231 03 

Miscellaneous 

METROPOLITAN PARKS EXPENSE FUND 

Receipts, Dec. 1, 1926 to Dec. 1, 1927: 
Bath Houses: 
Revere Beach: 

Sale of tickets $23,039 80 

Miscellaneous 95 45 



Nantasket Beach: 

Sale of tickets $13,948 45 

Steam furnished 2,804 71 

Miscellaneous 2 00 



Nahant Beach: 
Tickets . 



Magazine Beach: 
Tickets . 



Blue Hills: 

Tickets 



$23,135 25 




16,755 16 




7,447 75 




1,625 55 




265 00 


$49,228 71 



P.D. 48 43 

Metropolitan Parks Expense Fund — Continued 
Rentals: 

Buildings $46,905 00 

Houses 1,201 25 

Locations 1,246 48 

Ducts 2,883 38 

Land 4,287 83 

Miscellaneous 1 00 

$56,524 94 

Sales: 

Wood $1,943 35 

Old metal, lumber, etc 324 40 

Hay and grass 320 00 

Land ■ 2,500 00 

Shrubs 400 00 

Miscellaneous 472 29 

Court fines . . . . . . . . . . 

Income on investments and interest on daily balance .... 

Privileges 

Deposit for sidewalks under John W. Weeks Bridge .... 

Sidewalk and entrance construction 

Policing Water Board lands 

Repaving Wellington Bridge, reimbursement 

Repairing bridge, Revere, reimbursement 

Damage to property 

Cement bags returned 

Boat hire 

Miscellaneous 

Receipts, prior to Dec. 1, 1926 

Expenditures, Dec. 1, 1926 to Dec. l f 1927: 

General Expense: 
Interest and premium on securities purchased . . . $3,768 82 

Advertising 37 57 

$3,806 39 

Police: 
Repairs to uniforms . 744 95 

Engineering: 
Sidewalks under John W. Weeks Bridge .... $6,144 06 

Tickets, etc 61 81 



5,960 


04 


14,375 


00 


12,099 


93 


8,116 


67 


6,144 


06 


3,760 


84 


6,883 


94 


2,986 


60 


377 


06 


551 


17 


204 


92 


949 


10 


276 


40 


$168,439 


38 


2,990,384 


51 




— $3,158,823 89 



Blue Hills Reservation: 

Boats . $307 13 

Bath house expense 21 40 



6,205 87 



328 53 



Stony Brook Reservation: 
Repairs to houses ' . 166 62 

Quincy Shore Reservation: 
Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Cost . 147 44 

Blue Hills Parkway: 
Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Refund 153 38 

Old Colony Parkway: 
Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Refund 11 50 

Middlesex Fells Reservation: 
Repairs to houses 219 41 

Middlesex Fells Parkway: 
Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Cost $1,242 46 

Refund 466 26 



Mystic Valley Parkway: 
Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Cost $285 15 

Refund 45 35 



1,708 72 



330 50 



Lynn Fells Parkway: 
Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Cost 32 45 

Alewife Brook Parkway: 
Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Cost 373 75 

Middlesex Fells Roads: 
Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Cost 175 85 



44 



P.D. 48 



Metropolitan Parks Expense Fund — Concluded 



Revere Beach Reservation: 
Bath House: 
Payrolls . . 
Bathing suits, etc. 
Heat, light and power . 
Hardware, etc. 
Office supplies and expenses 

Repairs 

Medicines and attendance . 
Miscellaneous supplies 



Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Cost 

Refund 



$23,015 

2,413 

3.S48 

684 

433 

21,714 

61 

2,743 



93 
53 

52 
53 
47 
00 
95 
36 



$144 
102 



55 
53 



Lynn Shore Reservation: 
Sidewalk and entrance construction: 
Cost 



Revere Beach Parkway: 
Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Cost 

Refund 



Nahant Beach Parkway: 
Bath House: 

Payrolls 

Bathing suits, etc. 

Heat, light and power . 

Hardware, etc. 

Office supplies and expenses 

Repairs 

Medicines and attendance . 
Miscellaneous supplies 



Charles River Upper Division: 
Filling material .... 



Riverside Recreation Grounds: 
Water rates 



Fresh Pond Parkway: 
Sidewalk and entrance construction: 
Cost 



Charles River Lower Basin: 
Magazine Beach Bath House: 

Payrolls 

Heat, light and power . 
Hardware, etc. 
Office supplies and expenses 
Medicines and attendance . 
Miscellaneous supplies 

Repairs to tea-house 



Cambridge Parkway: 
Temporary road at Western Avenue: 
Labor and materials 
Lighting 



Bunker Hill: 
Lighting 
Telephone . 



Nantasket Beach Reservation: 
Bath House: 

Payrolls 

Bathing suits, etc. 
Heat, light and power . 

Hardware, etc 

Office supplies and expenses 
Medicines and attendance . 
Miscellaneous supplies 

Repairs to buildings 

Sea-wall 

Physician's services . 



$17,366 22 

28 52 

1,491 03 

260 45 

114 38 

28 42 

1,530 45 



$54,915 29 



247 08 



$339 
66 



99 
56 



$9,304 


95 


337 


32 


518 


86 


58 


38 


149 


85 


450 


97 


16 


56 


421 


03 



$2,690 04 




31 67 




54 31 




40 00 




5 92 




50 21 






$2,872 15 






69 39 



$893 20 
651 44 



$155 72 
17 33 



$20,819 47 

12,861 20 

5,403 92 

43 00 



Expenditures prior to Dec. 1, 1926 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 



555,162 37 
91 62 



406 55 



11,257 92 
53 90 

49 60 
70 28 



2,941 54 



1,544 64 



173 05 



39,127 59 

$125,284 42 
2,673,009 06 



2,798,293 48 
$360,530 41 



P.D. 48 45 

METROPOLITAN PARKS TRUST FUND 

R,6C61Dt-S * 

For the year ending Nov. 30, 1927 $110 01 

For the period prior to Dec. 1, 1926 40,883 73 

$40,993 74 

Expenditures: 

For the year ending Nov. 30, 1927 

For the period prior to Dec. 1, 1926 $38,106 50 

38,106 50 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $2,887 24 

EDWIN U. CURTIS MEMORIAL TRUST FUND 
Receipts: 

For the year ending Nov. 30, 1927 $42 47 

For the period prior to Dec. 1, 1926 1,415 63 

$1,458 10 

No expenditures - 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $1,458 10 

JOHN W. WEEKS BRIDGE TRUST FUND 

For the year ending Nov. 30, 1927 $708 92 

For the period prior to Dec. 1, 1926 234,877 33 

$235,586 25 

Expenditures: 

For the year ending Nov. 30, 1927 $81,858 54 

For the period prior to Dec. 1, 1926 153,429 36 

235,287 90 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $298 35 

GENERAL REVENUE, BUNKER HILL MONUMENT 

For the year ending Nov. 30, 1927 $4,794 40 

For the period prior to Dec. 1, 1926 21,188 40 

$25,982 80 

Maintenance 

METROPOLITAN PARKS MAINTENANCE FUND, GENERAL 

Appropriation (Chapter 138, Acts of 1927) $808,486 88 

Balance brought forward from 1926 appropriation to cover 1926 expenditures on 1927 books 35,142 42 



$843,629 30 
Expenditures 
Administration : 

Police $232,610 88 

Salaries: 

Commissioners $2,500 00 

Secretary, clerks, etc. . . . . . 9,371 81 

Chief Engineer and Assistants . . . 21,883 87 

33,755 68 

Rent, care and lighting of building 2,510 49 

Stationery, office supplies and expenses .... 2,410 98 

Printing 240 59 

Engineering supplies and expenses: 

General $1,506 62 

Auto expenses 753 73 

2,260 35 

Pensions and annuities 23,849 85 

$297,638 82 

Blue Hills Reservation: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $40,166 22 

Moth work 32,991 19 

Road repairs 7,366 00 

$80,523 41 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $13,646 24 

Moth work 2,293 79 

Road repairs 1,358 28 

17,298 31 

97,821 72 

Stony Brook Reservation: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $1,379 27 

Moth work 7,727 11 

$9,106 38 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $1,818 79 

Moth work 1,070 68 

2,889 47 

11,995 85 



46 P.D. 48 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, General — Continued 

Neponset River Reservation: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $6 75 

Moth work 1,615 25 

$1,622 00 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 285 56 

$1,907 56 

Quincy Shore Reservation: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $7,198 22 

Road repairs 908 00 

$8,106 22 

Street lighting 3,167 99 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $1,141 65 

Moth work 292 80 

Road repairs 16 25 

1,450 70 

12,724 91 

Middlesex Fells Reservation: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $51,075 22 

Moth work 28,494 35 

Road repairs 5,878 25 

$85,447 82 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $23,340 78 

Moth work 1,755 20 

Road repairs 490 67 

25,586 65 

111,034 47 

Mystic River Reservation: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $14,321 55 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 2,604 39 

16,925 94 

Revere Beach Reservation: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $45,623 66 

Road repairs 47 50 

45,671 16 

Street lighting 8,242 00 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 13,917 52 

Sea wall 5,724 70 

73,555 38 

Lynn Shore Reservation: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $10,363 72 

Road repairs 9 9 0J 

<jm 272 72 

Street lighting 2,850 00 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $2,849 91 

Road repairs 2,502 24 

5,352 15 

19,474 87 

Winthrop Shore Reservation: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $5,606 01 

Road repairs 381 50 

$5,987 51 

Street lighting _ 665 28 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $1,880 07 

Road repairs 438 41 

2,318 48 

Sea wall 4,725 12 

13,696 39 

Charles River Upper Division: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $44,045 23 

Moth work 4,772 25 

Road repairs 1,478 50 

$50,295 98 

Street lighting 4 1,62581 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $23,003 06 

Road repairs 2,480 82 

25,483 88 

77,405 67 

Riverside Recreation Grounds: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $5,066 50 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 3,225 37 

8,291 87 



P.D. 48 47 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, General — Concluded 

Beaver Brook Reservation: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $2,811 60 

Moth work 703 50 

$3,515 10 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 1,381 19 

$4,896 29 

Cambridge Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $31,395 54 

Moth work 911 50 

Road repairs 2,137 50 

$34,444 54 

Street lighting 3,531 31 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $17,139 74 

Road repairs 1,701 55 

18,841 29 

56,817 14 

John W. Weeks Bridge: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $22 50 

Street lighting 42 48 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 294 64 

359 62 

$804,546 50 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $39,082 80 

METROPOLITAN PARKS MAINTENANCE FUND, SPECIALS 

Band Concerts 
Appropriation (Chapter 138, Acts of 1927) $20,000 00 

Expenditures 

Advertising $29 70 

Bands: 

Blue Hills Division $1,013 20 

Middlesex Fells Division 2,270 00 

Revere Beach Division 3,792 75 

Charles River Upper Division 2,767 65 

Nantasket Beach Division 8,804 50 

Bunker Hill 165 00 

18,813 10 

18,842 80 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $1,157 20 

Clearing Woods 

Appropriation (amount approved by Workmen's Compensation Act) $2,883 86 

Expended to Dec. 1, 1926 2,031 86 

$852 00 
Expenditures 
Industrial accident compensation 696 43 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $155 57 

Quincy Shore Reservation 

Appropriation (Chapter 79, Acts of 1926) $140,000 00 

Expended to Dec. 1, 1926 126,730 61 

$13,269 39 
No expenditures - 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 1 $13,269 39 

Water Pipe, Revere Beach Reservation 

Appropriation (Chapter 79, Acts of 1926) $7,500 00 

Expended to Dec. 1, 1926 

$7,500 00 
Expenditures 
Labor and materials 7,429 59 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $70 41 

1 Reverted. 



48 p.D. 48 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, Specials — Concluded 

Certain Lands, Mystic Lakes 

Appropriation (Chapter 398, Acts of 1926) $25 000 00 

Expended to Dec. 1, 1926 

$25,000 00 
No expenditures _ 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $25,000 00 

Parking Spaces, Nahant Beach 
Appropriation (Chapter 343, Acts of 1927) $8,000 00 

Expenditures 

Labor $459 00 

Materials 7,096 27 

Engineering: 

Services $315 00 

Expenses 13 60 

328 60 

Advertising 12 30 

7,896 17 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $103 83 

Skating Pond, Blue Hills 
Appropriation (Chapter 343, Acts of 1927) $1,500 00 

Expenditures 

Labor $331 00 

Materials 523 14 

854 14 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $645 86 

Land for Reservation, Charles River, Dedham 
Appropriation (Chapter 343, Acts of 1927) $75,000 00 

Expenditures 

Land $36,245 01 

Engineering: 

Services $760 60 

Expenses 7 75 

768 35 

Legal: 

Services $12 15 

Expenses ". . 19 10 

31 25 

37,044 61 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $37,955 39 

METROPOLITAN PARKS MAINTENANCE FUND, BOULEVARDS, GENERAL 

Appropriation (Chapter 138, Acts of 1927) $430,000 00 

Balance brought forward from 1926 appropriation to cover 1926 expenditures on 1927 books 42,327 17 

$472,327 17 
Expenditures 
Administration : 

Police . $100,371 24 

Salaries: 

Commissioners $2,500 00 

Secretary, clerks, etc 9,701 00 

Chief Engineer and assistants . . . 20,068 99 

32.269 99 

Rent, care and lighting of building 3,194 38 

Stationery, office supplies and expenses .... 1,987 55 

Printing . 240 59 

Engineering supplies and expenses: 

General $1,389 24 

Auto expenses 927 33 

2,316 57 

$140,380 32 

Blue Hills Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $6,327 73 

Street Lighting 3,114 14 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General ' $1,413 26 

Road repairs 85 30 

— ■ 1,498 56 

10,940 43 

Neponset River Parkway: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $992 25 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 299 57 

1,291 82 



P.D. 48 49 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, Boulevards, General — Continued 

Furnace Brook Parkway: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $6,223 13 

Street lighting 3,563 17 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $1,047 59 

Road repairs 209 04 

1,256 63 

$11,042 93 

Old Colony Parkway: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $3,282 50 

Moth work 185 34 

$3,467 84 

Street lighting 2,130 76 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General .... ... $709 61 

Road repairs 46 89 

756 50 

6,355 10 

West Roxbury Parkway: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $1,176 86 

Road repairs 370 20 

$1,547 06 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $1,232 22 

Road repairs 379 19 

1,611 41 

3,158 47 

Dedham Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $399 00 

Moth work 191 55 

$590 55 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General . . . . . . . . $293 61 

Road repairs 239 72 

533 33 

1,123 88 

Middlesex Fells Parkway: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $23,493 10 

Moth work 357 96 

Road repairs 4,523 55 

$28,374 61 

Street lighting 19,306 77 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General .... ... $6,434 92 

Road repairs 1,563 50 

7,998 42 

55,679 80 

Mystic Valley Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $21,450 09 

Moth work 1,142 90 

Road repairs 393 00 

$22,985 99 

Street, lighting 4,659 40 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General .... ... $15,325 68 

Road repairs . . . ' . . . . 784 50 

16,110 18 

43,755 57 

Lynn Fells Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $4,858 84 

Road repairs 127 00 

$4,985 84 

Street lighting 1,223 38 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 757 77 

6,966 99 

Middlesex Fells Roads: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $7,765 01 

Road repairs 5,398 07 

$13,163 08 

Street lighting 3,131 44 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General .... ... $1,220 78 

Road repairs 822 30 

2,043 08 

18,337 60 



50 P.D. 48 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, Boulevards, General — Continued 

Woburn Parkway: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $3,918 64 

Moth work ' . 94 50 

$4,013 14 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 1,053 88 

$5,067 02 

Alewife Brook Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $9,174 68 

Moth work 183 92 

Road repairs 189 00 

$9,547 60 

Street lighting 860 07 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General .... ... $5,950 53 

Road repairs 113 48 

6,064 01 

16,471 68 

Revere Beach Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $29,314 70 

Moth work 18 50 

Road repairs 4,424 00 

$33,757 20 

Street lighting _ 13,683 58 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General .... ... $10,242 30 

Road repairs 5,360 94 

15,603 24 

— 63,044 02 

Nahant Beach Parkway: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $6,451 29 

Street lighting 980 00 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 455 02 

7,886 31 

Winthrop Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $1,961 25 

Road repairs 165 50 

$2,126 75 

Street lighting 1,385 76 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General .... ... $292 43 

Road repairs 101 38 

393 81 

3,906 32 

Lynnway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $11,997 10 

Road repairs 325 50 

$12,322 60 

Street lighting 344 36 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General .... ... $2,337 66 

Road repairs Ill 36 

2,449 02 

15,115 98 

Hammond Pond Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $211 50 

Moth work 2,036 25 

$2,247 75 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General .... .• 177 20 

2,424 95 

Fresh Pond Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $4,364 50 

Moth work 334 00 

$4,698 50 

Street lighting . 326 53 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 1,119 34 

6,144 37 

Cottage Farm Bridge: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $6,651 70 

Road repairs 432 00 

$7,083 70 

Street lighting 514 43 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General .... ... $79 47 

Road repairs 166 14 

245 61 

7,843 74 



P.D. 48 51 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, Boulevards, General — Concluded 

Harvard Bridge: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $6,390 17 

Road repairs . 373 75 

$6,763 92 

Street lighting 2,132 83 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $274 50 

Road repairs 43 22 

317 72 



Neponset Bridge: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $9,546 94 

Street lighting 1,321 82 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 1,730 61 



$9,214 47 



12,599 37 
Western Avenue Bridge: 
Street lighting 45 83 



$448,796 97 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $23,530 20 

METROPOLITAN PARKS MAINTENANCE FUND, BOULEVARDS — SPECIALS 

Blue Hill River Road 

Appropriation (Chapter 211, Acts of 1925, reappropriated) . $75,000 00 

Appropriation (Chapter 311, Acts of 1927) 25,000 00 

Expenditures 
Construction: 

Contract, James H. Fannon « $28,389 81 

Engineering: 

Services $7,649 75 

Expenses 646 38 

8,296 13 

Advertising 74 90 



$100,000 00 



36,760 84 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 . $63,239 16 

West Roxbury Parkway Extension 

Appropriation (Chapter 313, Acts of 1925) $222,000 00 

Expended to Dec. 1, 1926 110,015 63 



Expenditures 
Construction: 

Contract, Thomas J. McCue Const. Co $23,581 51 

Labor and materials . . 1,987 68 



$111,984 37 



$25,569 19 

Land . ..... 1,821 50 

Engineering: 

Services $2,508 23 

Expenses 93 43 

Legal: 

Services $4 29 

Expenses 2 02 



2,601 66 



6 31 



29,998 66 



$81,985 71 
Less amount, Chapter 231, Acts of 1927 50,000 00 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 > $31,985 71 

Parkway in Brookline 
Appropriation (Chapter 231, Acts of 1927) $50,000 00 

Expenditures 

Land $4,197 18 

Legal: 

Expenses ■ 3 09 



4,200 27 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $45,799 73 

Electric Lighting System 

Appropriation (Chapter 138, Acts of 1927) $50,000 00 

Balance brought forward from 1926 appropriation to cover 1926 expenditures on 1927 books 7,806 72 

$57,806 72 
1 Reverted. 



52 P.D. 48 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, Boulevards — Specials — Continued 
Electric Lighting System — Concluded 

Expenditures 
Installation of conduits, etc.: 

Labor and materials $50,473 35 

Physicians' services 25 50 

$50,498 85 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $7,307 87 

Resurfacing Boulevards and Parkways 

Appropriation (Chapter 138, Acts of 1927) $100,000 00 

Balance brought forward from 1926 appropriation to cover 1926 expenditures on 1927 books 25,294 73 



$125,294 73 
Expenditures 
Stony Brook Reservation: 
Construction: 

Contract, Coleman Bros., Inc. . . . $39,123 37 

Labor and materials 12,766 40 

$51,889 77 

Engineering: 

Services $3,947 66 

Expenses . 270 90 

4,218 56 

Advertising 58 25 

$56,166 58 

Cambridge Parkway: 
Construction: 

Contract, Simpson Bros. Corp. . . . $22,129 76 

Labor and materials 520 43 

$22,650 19 

Engineering: 

Services 1,030 65 

Advertising 155 75 

23,836 59 

Middlesex Fells Parkway: 
Construction: 

Contract, James H. Fannon . . . $7,346 15 

Labor and materials 10,347 90 

$17,694 05 

Physicians' services 29 00 

Industrial accident compensation 112 00 

17,835 05 

Revere Beach Parkway: 
Construction: 

Labor and materials 23,360 01 

121,198 23 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $4,096 50 

Quincy Shore Roadway 

Appropriation (Chapter 79, Acts of 1926) $140,000 00 

Expended to Dec. 1, 1926 85,996 52 

$54,003 48 
Expenditures 
Construction: 

Contract, Paul Caputo $36,686 51 

Labor and materials 2,534 21 

$39,220 72 

Engineering: 

Services $90 00 

Expenses 26 98 

116 98 

39,337 70 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $14,665 78 

Land for Boulevard, Stoneham 

Appropriation (Chapter 398, Acts of 1926) v . . . $10,000 00 

Expended to Dec. 1, 1926 1,312 27 

$8,687 73 
Expenditures 
Engineering: 

Services $2,172 91 

Expenses 27 90 

2,200 81 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $6,486 92 

Old Colony Boulevard 

Appropriation (Chapter 398, Acts of 1926) $250,000 00 

Appropriation (Chapter 138, Acts of 1927) 500,000 00 

$750,000 00 
Expended to Dec. 1, 1926 35,841 85 

$714,158 15 



P.D. 48 



53 



Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, Boulevards — Specials 
Old Colony Boulevard — Concluded 



Continued 



Construction: 
Contracts: 

Coleman Bros., Inc. 


Expenditures 

. $113,878 31 
84,511 55 


$229,841 05 
36,395 40 

13,030 22 

8 76 

25 00 

5,880 00 

118 09 

129 50 






31,451 19 




Engineering: 


$12,752 70 

277 52 




Legal: 


$5 69 

3 07 




Architect's services, plans, e1 


Cottage Farm Boulevard 
Acts of 1926) 

Expenditures 

ging & Cont. Co. . . . $8,979 14 
32,979 17 


$285,428 02 




$41,958 31 

7 46 

42 51 
730 00 


Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 

Appropriation (Chapter 398, 
Expended to Dec. 1, 1926 


$428,730 13 

$50,000 00 
317 17 


Construction: 

Contract, Bay State Dred 


$49,682 83 


Engineering: 

Legal: 

Services .... 


Circumferential Highway 
Acts of 1926) 

Expenditures 

$5,331 74 

470 58 


42,738 28 




$287 75 

5,802 32 

67 69 
2,200 00 


Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 

Appropriation (Chapter 398, 
Expended to Dec. 1, 1926 


$6,944 55 

$115,000 00 
360 00 


Construction: 

Engineering: 

Services .... 
Expenses 


$114,640 00 


Legal: 


$17 10 

50 59 






Extension of Quincy Shore Reservation 
Acts of 1927) 

Expenditures 

North Harvard Street, Western Avenue 
Expenditures 


8,357 76 




$869 71 
7 95 


Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 

Appropriation (Chapter 343, 

Engineering: 

Services .... 
Expenses 


$106,282 24 
$35,000 00 

877 66 




Boulevard 


Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 

Land for 
Appropriation (Chapter 343, 

Legal: 


$34,122 34 

$80,000 00 

15 72 


Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 


$79,984 28 



54 P.D. 48 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, Boulevards — Specials — Concluded 

North Harvard Street, Western Avenue Boulevard 

Appropriation (Chapter 398, Acts of 1926) $70,000 00 

Expended to Dec. 1, 1926 31,525 63 



Expenditures 
Construction: 
Contracts: 

Thomas J. McCue Const. Co. . . $25,658 49 
T. Stuart & Son Co 2,200 00 



$27,858 49 
Labor and materials 4,921 54 



Engineering: 

Services $1,823 26 

Expenses 34 31 



$32,780 03 
1,857 57 



Expenditures 
Park and Water Areas: 

Police $71,523 30 

Labor and teaming: 

General $41,543 74 

Road repairs 450 00 

41,993 74 

Street lighting 4,371 19 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 8,245 77 



Locks, Gates and Drawbridges: 

General labor . $54,545 45 

General supplies and miscellaneous expenses . . . 10,353 73 



$126,134 00 
64,899 18 



Expenditures 

Police $27,646 12 

Labor and teaming: 

General 38,599 92 

Street lighting _ 1,884 49 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General .... $11,662 32 

Road repairs 893 69 

■ 12,556 01 



Expenditures 

General labor $10,883 15 

Street lighting . 451 16 

General supplies and miscellaneous expenses 1,979 52 



$38,474 37 



34,637 60 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $3,836 77 

CHARLES RIVER BASIN MAINTENANCE 

Appropriation (Chapter 138, Acts of 1927) $201,500 00 

Balance brought forward from 1926 appropriation to cover 1926 expenditures on 1927 books 11,753 84 



$213,253 84 



191,033 18 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $22,220 66 

NANTASKET BEACH MAINTENANCE 

Appropriation (Chapter 138, Acts of 1927) $83,400 00 

Balance brought forward from 1926 appropriation to cover 1926 expenditures on 1927 books 2,447 20 



$85,847 20 



80,686 54 
Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $5,160 66 

WELLINGTON BRIDGE MAINTENANCE 

Appropriation (Chapter 138, Acts of 1927) $14,000 00 

Balance brought forward from 1926 appropriation to cover 1926 expenditures on 1927 books 734 51 



$14,734 51 



13,313 83 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $1,420 68 

BUNKER HILL MAINTENANCE 

Appropriation (Chapter 138, Acts of 1927) $11,500 00 

Appropriation (Chapter 343, Acts of 1927) 69 34 

$11,569 34 



$173,241 52 



P.D. 48 * 55 

Bunker Hill Maintenance — Concluded 

Expenditures 

Police $4,159 97 

Labor and teaming: 

General 4,827 32 

Flood lighting 122 40 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 1,594 83 

$10,704 52 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $864 82 

Analysis of 1927 Receipts 

Credited to: 

Metropolitan Parks Expense Fund . $168,447 12 

General Revenue 4,794 40 

Bonds, Sinking Funds and Net Debt 

METROPOLITAN PARKS CONSTRUCTION, SERIES I 
Bonds issued: 
Sinking Fund: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1927 ... 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1926 . . $9,485,000 00 

$9,485,000 00 

Serial Bonds and Notes: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1927 . . . $43,043 96 
Period prior to Dec. 1, 1926 . . . 324,000 00 

367,043 96 

$9,852,043 96 

Serial Bonds and Notes paid: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1927 $55,793 96 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1926 234,000 00 

289,793 96 

Bonds outstanding Dec. 1, 1927 $9,562,250 00 

Sinking Fund: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1927 $5,936,887 78 

Total, Dec. 1, 1926 5,654,500 89 

Increase during 1927 $282,386 89 

Net Debt: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1927 $3,625,362 22 

Total, Dec. 1, 1926 . 3,920,499 11 

Decrease during 1927 $295,136 89 

METROPOLITAN PARKS CONSTRUCTION, SERIES II 
Bonds issued: 
Sinking Fund: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1927 . 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1926 . . $2,567,500 00 

$2,567,500 00 

Serial Bonds and Notes: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1927 . . $9,119 12 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1926 . . 2,373,937 50 

2,383,056 62 

$4,950,556 62 

Serial Bonds paid: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1927 $112,437 50 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1926 577,625 00 

690,062 50 

Bonds outstanding Dec. 1, 1927 * $4,260,494 12 

Sinking Fund: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1927 $1,507,658 79 

Total, Dec. 1, 1926 1,435,951 37 

Increase during 1927 $71,707 42 

Net Debt: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1927 $2,752,835 33 

Total, Dec. 1, 1926 2,927,861 13 

Decrease during 1927 $175,025 80 

CHARLES RIVER BASIN CONSTRUCTION 
Bonds issued: 
Sinking Fund: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1927 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1926 . . $4,125,000 00 

$4,125,000 00 

Serial Bonds: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1927 . 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1926 . . $375,000 00 

375,000 00 

$4,500,000 00 



56 P.D. 48 

Charles River Basin Construction — Concluded 
Serial Bonds paid: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1927 ....'. $10,000 00 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1926 142,000 00 

$152,000 00 

Bonds outstanding Dec. 1, 1927 $4,348,000 00 

Sinking Fund: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1927 $1,903,269 95 

Total, Dec. 1, 1926 1,817,269 44 

Increase during 1927 $86,000 51 

Net Debt: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1927 $2,444,730 05 

Total, Dec. 1, 1926 2,540.730 56 

Decrease during 1927 $96,000 51 

CHARLES RIVER BRIDGES CONSTRUCTION 
Notes issued: 1 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1927 $2,550,000 00 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1926 1,100,000 00 

$3,650,000 00 

Notes paid: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1927 $1,200,000 00 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1926 900,000 00 

$2,100,000 00 

Notes outstanding: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1927 $1,550,000 00 

Net debt, Dec. 1, 1927 $1,550,000 00 

SEWERAGE DIVISION 
Construction 

METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE CONSTRUCTION FUND, NORTH SYSTEM 

Total amount appropriated to Dec. 1, 1926 $8,288,500 00 

Appropriation (Chapter 138, Acts of 1927) 23,021 55 

Appropriation (Chapter 184, Acts of 1927) 450,000 00 

$8,761,521 55 
Receipts: 

For period prior to Dec. 1, 1926 $87,514 78 

For the year ending Nov. 30, 1927 

■ 87,514 78 

$8,849,036 33 
Expenditures 
Sewer in Medford and Arlington: 
Construction: 
Contracts: 

A. Baruffaldi Co. . . $5,744 68 
Antony Cefalo . . . 2,306 23 
Antony Cefalo . . . 17,540 48 

$25,591 39 

Labor and materials 631 84 

$26,223 23 

Land 1,798 00 

Damages 1,164 69 

Engineering: 

Services $2,150 00 

Supplies and expenses .... 226 60 

2,376 60 

Legal: 

Services $414 26 

Expenses 24 15 

438 41 

$32,000 93 

Belmont Extension: 

Construction: 
Contracts: 

J. H. Ferguson Co $58,154 39 

Labor and material 2,495 99 

$60,650 38 

Advertising 17 20 

Engineering: 

Services $6,393 33 

Supplies and expenses 659 77 

7,053 10 

67,720 68 

1 Including renewals. 



P.D. 48 57 

Metropolitan Sewerage Construction Fund, North System — Concluded 

New Mystic Valley Main Sewer, Sec. 109: 
Engineering: 

Services . $2,138 34 

Labor and material 1,190 48 

$3,328 82 

New Mystic Valley Main Sewer, Sec. 110: 

Engineering: 

Supplies and expenses $211 86 

Labor and materials 221 08 

432 94 

$3,761 76 

$103 483 37 
Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1926 8,114!662 12 

$8,218,145 49 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $630,890 84 

METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE CONSTRUCTION FUND, SOUTH SYSTEM 

Total amount appropriated to Dec. 1, 1926 $10,002,912 00 

Appropriation (Chapter 138, Acts of 1927) 2,239 75 

$10,005,151 75 
Receipts: 

For period prior to Dec. 1, 1926 $24,599 61 

For the year ending Nov. 30, 1927 

24,599 61 

$10,029,751 36 
Expenditures 
Wellesley Sewer: 

Damages $275 00 

Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1926 10,004,652 59 

10,004,927 59 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $24,823 77 

Miscellaneous 

SURFACE DRAINAGE IN MALDEN, EVERETT AND REVERE 
Appropriation $70,000 00 

Expenditures 
Engineering: 

Expenses $1 00 

Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1926 2,892 33 

■ 2,893 33 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $67,106 67 

i 

Maintenance 

METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE MAINTENANCE FUND, NORTH SYSTEM — GENERAL 

Appropriation, Dec. 1, 1926 to Dec. 1, 1927 (Chapter 138, Acts of 1927) .... $330,000 00 
Balance brought forward from 1926 appropriation to cover 1926 expenditures on 1927 books 55,718 66 

$385,718 66 
Expenditures 
Administration : 
Salaries: 

Commissioners . . . $1,250 00 
Secretary and clerks . . 4,501 44 

$5,751 44 

Rent, light and heat 3,459 52 

Stationery, office supplies and expenses . 603 77 

Printing 76 93 

$9,891 66 

Engineering: 

Salaries: 

Chief engineer and assistants . . . $9,295 85 
Engineering supplies and expenses . 152 53 

9,448 38 

Industrial accident compensation 2,777 57 

$22,117 61 

Deer Island Pumping Station: 

Labor $37,673 83 

Fuel 24,769 34 

Oil, waste and packing 917 67 

Water 1,535 16 

Repairs and renewals 1,174 25 

General supplies 940 36 

Miscellaneous expenses 1,441 99 

68,452 60 

New wharf at Deer Island 5,998 87 



58 P.D. 48 

Metropolitan Sewerage Maintenance Fund, North System — General — Concluded 

East Boston Pumping Station: 

Labor $43,164 46 

Fuel 20,655 40 

Oil, waste and packing . . • 1,268 60 

Water 1,696 20 

Repairs, ordinary . . 29 86 

Repairs and renewals 1,621 69 

General supplies 1,932 97 

Miscellaneous expenses 1,318 00 

$71,687 18 

Charlestown Pumping Station: 

Labor $28,291 83 

Fuel 7,906 32 

Oil, waste and packing . . . . . . . . 574 85 

Water 582 65 

Repairs and renewals 384 81 

General supplies 611 40 

Miscellaneous expenses 1,132 35 

39,484 21 

Alewife Brook Pumping Station: 

Labor $14,383 71 

Fuel 3,995 92 

Oil, waste and packing 357 00 

Water 901 08 

Repairs and renewals 842 57 

General supplies 477 18 

Miscellaneous expenses 799 66 

21,757 12 

Reading Pumping Station: 

Labor $7,113 50 

Fuel 199 70 

General supplies 4,388 32 

Miscellaneous expenses 247 65 

11,949 17 

Sewer Lines, Buildings and Grounds: 

Engineering assistants $3,060 00 

Labor 64,840 64 

Deer Island Ferry ... 1,633 34 

Automobiles 1,862 92 

Brick, cement and lime 478 24 

Castings, iron work, etc. 1,248 90 

Freight, express and teaming 11 99 

Repairs, ordinary 11 90 

Repairs and renewals 6 47 

Lumber, paint, etc 8,005 65 

Machinery, tools and appliances 704 34 

Rubber and oiled goods 176 00 

Sand, gravel and stone 72 64 

General supplies 11,518 94 

Miscellaneous expenses . 10,424 00 

104,055 97 

Stables: 

Labor $2,700 00 

Hay, grain and bedding 340 70 

Vehicles, harnesses, etc 9 80 

Miscellaneous expenses 233 19 

— — - 3,283 69 

$348,786 42 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $36,932 24 

METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE MAINTENANCE FUND, NORTH SYSTEM — SPECIAL 

Certain Renewals and Improvements 
Appropriation (Chapter 138, Acts of 1927) $23,500 00 

Expenditures 
Contracts: 

International Engineering Works, Inc $2,215 00 

D. M. Dillon Steam Boiler Works 8,075 00 

Starkweather & Broadhurst 3,067 50 

$13,357 50 

Labor and materials 9,120 00 

22,477 50 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $1,022 50 



P.D. 48 



59 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE MAINTENANCE FUND, SOUTH SYSTEM — GENERAL 



Appropriation, Dec. 1, 1926 to Dec. 1, 1927 (Chapter 138, Acts of 1927) .... 
Balance brought forward from 1926 appropriation to cover 1926 expenditures on 1927 books 

Expenditures 
Administration: 
Salaries: 

Commissioners . . . $1,250 00 
Secretary and clerks . . 3,828 57 

$5,078 57 

Rent, light and heat 1,889 81 

Stationery, office supplies and expenses . 676 58 

Printing 76 93 

$7,721 89 

Engineering: 
Chief engineer and assistants . . . $8,189 99 

Engineering supplies and expenses . J 248 31 

8,438 30 

Industrial accident compensation 24 43 

$16,184 62 

Ward Street Pumping Station: 

Labor $46,999 07 

Fuel 20,295 99 

Oil, waste and packing 1,343 28 

Water 2,142 36 

Repairs and renewals 2,450 67 

General supplies 1,210 07 

Miscellaneous expenses 2,002 11 

76,443 55 

Quincy Pumping Station: 

Labor $14,728 50 

Fuel 4,407 19 

Oil, waste and packing 628 99 

Water 405 56 

Repairs and renewals 324 14 

General supplies . . 201 12 

Miscellaneous expenses 217 23 

20,912 73 

Nut Island Screen House: 

Labor $15,270 50 

Fuel 4,421 71 

Oil, waste and packing 170 60 

Water 512 35 

Repairs and renewals 3161 

General supplies . . . 257 75 

Miscellaneous expenses 369 33 

21,033 85 

Sewer Lines, Buildings and Grounds: 

Engineering assistants $6,810 00 

Labor 49,421 52 

Automobiles 372 64 

Brick, cement and lime 59 29 

Castings, iron work, etc. 7 48 

Freight, express and teaming 78 

Fuel and lighting 46 67 

Repairs, ordinary 47 00 

Lumber, paint, etc 706 38 

Machinery, tools and appliances 75 12 

Rubber and oiled goods 89 96 

Sand, gravel and stone 11111 

General supplies 999 33 

Miscellaneous expenses 3,165 25 

Pumping by City of Boston 10,300 00 

72,212 53 

Stables: 

Labor $810 00 

Hay, grain and bedding 415 34 

Vehicles, harnesses, etc 6 76 

Miscellaneous expenses 139 26 

1,371 36 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 



$213,000 
25,055 



00 
40 



$238,055 40 



208,158 64 
$29,896 76 



Analysis of 1927 Receipts 

Credited to: 

Metropolitan Sewerage Sinking Fund, North System .... 
Metropolitan Sewerage Maintenance Fund, South System . 



$275 00 
95 28 



$370 28 



60 P.D. 48 

Bonds, Sinking Funds and Net Debt 

METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE CONSTRUCTION, NORTH SYSTEM 

Bonds issued: 
Sinking Fund: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1927 .... 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1926 . . $6,563,000 00 

$6,563,000 00 

Serial Bonds: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1927 . 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1926 . . $1,725,500 00 

1,725,500 00 

— $8,288,500 00 

Serial Bonds paid: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1927 $94,500 00 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1926 454,500 00 

549,000 00 

Bonds outstanding Dec. 1, 1927 $7,739,500 00 

Sinking Fund: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1927 $5,569,804 49 

Total, Dec. 1, 1926 5,184,030 57 

Increase during 1927 $385,773 92 

Net Debt: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1927 $2,169,695 51 

Total, Dec. 1, 1926 2,649,969 43 

Decrease during 1927 $480,273 92 

METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE CONSTRUCTION, SOUTH SYSTEM 

Bonds issued: 
Sinking Fund: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1927 . 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1926 . . $8,877,912 00 

$8,877,912 00 

Serial Bonds: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1927 . 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1926 . . $1,125,000 00 

• ■ 1,125,000 00 

$10,002,912 00 

Serial Bonds paid: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1927 $32,000 00 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1926 275,000 00 

307,000 00 

Bonds outstanding Dec. 1, 1927 $9,695,912 00 

Sinking Fund: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1927 $3,743,716 68 

Total, Dec. 1, 1926 3,421,007 25 

Increase during 1927 $322,709 43 

Net Debt: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1927 $5,952,195 32 

Total, Dec. 1, 1926 6,306,904 75 

Decrease during 1927 $354,709 43 

WATER DIVISION 
Construction 

METROPOLITAN WATER CONSTRUCTION FUND 

Total amount appropriated to Dec. 1, 1926 $46,705,000 00 

Appropriation (Chapter 138, Acts of 1927) 275,000 00 

$46,980,000 00 

For period prior to Dec. 1, 1926 $304,492 78 

For the year ending Nov. 30, 1927 2,337 37 

306,830 15 

$47,286,830 15 



P.D. 48 Gl 

Metropolitan Water Construction Fund — Concluded 

Expenditures 
Certain Improvements: 
Improving Wachusett Watershed: 

Land $5,578 75 

Legal services 32 17 

■ $5,610 92 

Less amount transferred to Water Const. Fund, Special . 49,187 75 

$43,576 83i 

Low Service Pipe Lines, Section 51: 

Engineering: 

Services . 58 33 

Southern High Service, Section 52: 
Construction: 

Contract, Biggs Const. Co. . . . $210,328 86 
Labor and materials . . . . 28,156 26 

$238,485 12 

Engineering: 

Services $20,032 14 

Expenses 3,284 46 

■ 23,316 60 

Land 969 15 

Appraising 725 00 

Legal: 

Services $586 48 

Expenses 22 16 

608 64 

264,104 51 

Northern High Service, Section 48: 

Construction: 

Contract, Cenedella & Co $14,507 48 

Engineering: 

Services $684 29 

Expenses 956 38 

■ 1,640 67 

Appraising 100 00 

Legal expenses 3 54 • 

16,251 69 

Meters and Connections: 

Labor . ' 1,760 11 

Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains, Section 10: 
Engineering: 

Services $133 13 

Labor and materials 1,688 03 

Land 150 00 

Legal services 5 61 

1,976 77 

Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains, Section 11: 

Labor and materials 1,166 96 

Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains, Section 12: 
Construction: 

Contract, C. & R. Const. Co. . . $4,564 59 

Labor and materials . . . . 212 00 

$4,776 59 

Engineering: 

Services 168 70 

4,945 29 

Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains, Watertown Branch: 

Construction: 

Contract, C. & R. Const. Co. . . $33,764 61 

Labor and materials .... 6,654 00 

$40,418 61 

Engineering: 

Services $4,837 44 

Expenses 332 96 

5,170 40 

Printing 5 82 

Legal services 106 39 

45,701 22 

Protection of Supply: 

Land $600 00 

Legal: 

Services $17 22 

Expenses 10 00 

27 22 

627 22 

Stock 46,456 78 

Property for Protection of Water Supply 49,190 95 

$388,663 00 
Less stock transferred to other accounts 217 73 

$388 445 27 

Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1926 46,659,401 50 

$47,047,846 77 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 . $238,983 38 

1 Credit. 



62 P.D. 48 

Maintenance 

METROPOLITAN WATER MAINTENANCE FUND — GENERAL 

Appropriation, Dec. 1, 1926 to Dec. 1, 1927 (Chapter 138, Acts of 1927) .... $851,00000 
Balance brought forward from 1926 appropriation to cover 1926 expenditures on 1927 books 48,709 32 

$899,709 32 
Expenditures 
Administration : 
Salaries: 

Commissioners . . . $2,500 00 
Secretary and clerks . . 9,684 59 

$12,184 59 

Rent, light and heat 2,465 54 

Stationery, office supplies and expenses . 1,760 14 

Printing 153 86 

$16,564 13 

Engineering: 

Chief engineer and assistants . . . $24,354 55 

Engineering supplies and expenses . . 2,139 53 

Biological Laboratory: 

Labor $3,412 27 

Supplies and expenses . . 425 68 

3,837 95 

30,332 03 

Payments in lieu of taxes 52,990 84 

Industrial accident compensation 1,008 19 

$100,895 19 

Wachusett Department: 
Superintendence : 

Labor $11,506 69 

Supplies and expenses 1,420 98 

$12,927 67 

Reservoir: 

Labor . . $23,235 65 

Supplies and expenses . . * . . . 2,232 43 

25,468 08 

Forestry: 

Labor . . $15,333 92 

Supplies and expenses 1,535 29 

16,869 21 

Protection of supply: 

Labor $7,667 15 

Supplies and expenses 1,079 22 

8,746 37 

Buildings and grounds: 

Labor $7,622 30 

Supplies and expenses 2,062 07 

9,684 37 

Wachusett Dam: 

Labor $10,116 21 

Supplies and expenses 625 17 

10,741 38 

Wachusett Aqueduct: 

Labor $9,739 02 

Supplies and expenses 554 02 

10,293 04 

Clinton Sewerage System: 

Pumping Station: 

Labor $1,503 04 

Supplies and expenses . 2,637 22 

$4,140 26 

Sewers, screens and filter beds: 

Labor $8,799 95 

Repairs and supplies . 2,527 18 

— 11,327 13 

15,467 39 

Sanitary inspection: 

Labor $1,190 03 

Supplies and expenses 672 60 

1,862 63 

Swamp drainage: 

Labor $8,919 70 

Supplies and expenses 813 44 

9,733 14 

Power plant: 

Labor $9,212 14 

Supplies and expenses 807 60 

10,019 74 

Wachusett-Sudbury Power Transmission Line: 

Supplies and expenses 60 30 

131,873 32 

Sudbury Department: 
Superintendence : 

Labor $12,731 86 

Supplies and expenses 2,748 30 

$15,480 16 



P.D. 48 

Metropolitan Water Maintenance Fund 
Ashland Reservoir: 

Labor $4,575 10 

Supplies and expenses 518 10 

Hopkinton Reservoir: 

Labor $4,160 89 

Supplies and expenses 427 29 

Whitehall Reservoir: 

Labor $4,391 02 

Supplies and expenses 86 23 

Framingham Reservoirs, 1, 2 and 3: 

Labor $14,160 97 

Supplies and expenses 2,220 55 

Sudbury Reservoir: 

Labor $13,151 52 

Supplies and expenses .'.... 1,682 19 

Lake Cochituate: 

Labor $10,454 75 

Supplies and expenses 2,954 04 

Marlborough Brook Filters: 

Labor $5,298 77 

Supplies and expenses 214 51 

Pegan Filters: 

Labor $6,747 53 

Supplies and expenses 2,527 88 

Sudbury and Cochituate Watersheds: 

Labor $4,741 08 

Supplies and expenses 613 01 

Sanitary inspection: 

Labor . . $6,654 32 

Supplies and expenses 904 55 

Cochituate Aqueduct: 

Labor $4,138 05 

Supplies and expenses 385 23 

Sudbury Aqueduct: 

Labor $11,635 53 

Supplies and expenses 6,933 18 

Weston Aqueduct: 

Labor $9,380 46 

Supplies and expenses 819 87 

Forestry: 

Labor $11,334 36 

Supplies and expenses 373 61 

Sudbury Power Plant: 

Labor $14,434 02 

Supplies and expenses 2,057 34 

Distribution Department: 
Superintendence : 

Labor $12,336 28 

Supplies and expenses 1,363 43 

Arlington Reservoir: 

Labor $650 08 

Supplies and expenses 392 98 

Bear Hill Reservoir: 

Labor $270 00 

Supplies and expenses 27 10 

Bellevue Reservoir: 

Labor $262 09 

Supplies and expenses 92 78 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir and grounds: 

Labor $19,122 33 

Supplies and expenses 13,870 26 

Fells Reservoir: 

Labor $1,567 50 

Supplies and expenses 603 77 



63 



— General — Continued 
$5,093 20 

4,588 18 

4,477 25 
16,381 52 
14,833 71 
13,408 79 

5,513 28 

9,275 41 

5,354 09 

7,558 87 

4,523 28 
18,568 71 
10,200 33 
11,707 97 



16,491 36 



$13,699 71 



1,043 06 



297 10 



354 87 



32,992 59 



2,171 27 



$163,456 11 



64 

Metropolitan Water Maintenance Fund 

Fisher Hill Reservoir: 

Labor $2,275 11 

Supplies and expenses . . . . 1,142 84 

Forbes Hill Reservoir: 

Labor $1,980 13 

Supplies and expenses 559 52 

Mystic Reservoir: 

Labor $1,484 08 

Supplies and expenses 80 

Spot Pond Reservoir: 

Labor $10,374 61 

Supplies and expenses 3,404 02 

Waban Hill Reservoir: 

Labor $249 75 

Supplies and expenses 95 80 

Weston Reservoir: 

Labor $6,282 12 

Supplies and expenses 1,185 73 

Mystic Lake, Conduit and Pumping Station: 

Labor $1,722 05 

Supplies and expenses 1,238 31 

Buildings at Chestnut Hill Reservoir: 

Labor $5,347 25 

Supplies and expenses 404 88 

Buildings at Spot Pond Reservoir: 

Labor $1,188 25 

Supplies and expenses 297 91 

Low Service Pipe Lines: 

Labor $43,801 56 

Supplies and expenses 6,551 83 

Northern High Service Pipe Lines: 

Labor $11,911 18 

Supplies and expenses 17,297 89 

Northern Extra High Service Pipe Lines: 

Labor $156 19 

Supplies and expenses 10 94 

Southern High Service Pipe Lines: 

Labor $12,294 08 

Supplies and expenses 1,463 23 

Southern Extra High Service Pipe Lines: 

Labor $516 73 

Supplies and expenses 10 97 

Supply Pipe Lines: 

Labor $3,038 65 

Supplies and expenses 4,301 29 

Chestnut Hill Pipe Yard: 

Labor $1,959 18 

Supplies and expenses 570 23 

Glenwood Pipe Yard: 

Labor $2,392 50 

Supplies and expenses 1,314 25 

Stables and garages: 

Labor $3,892 74 

Supplies and expenses 4,465 83 

Venturi meters: 

Labor $1,825 30 

Supplies and expenses 821 47 

Measurement of water: 

Labor $4,071 48 

Supplies and expenses . . . . ' . 427 35 

Arlington Pumping Station, buildings and 
grounds: 

Labor $1,245 59 

Supplies and expenses 36 65 



P.D. 48 



— General — Continued 

$3,417 95 

2,539 65 

1,484 88 

13,778 63 

345 55 

7,467 85 

2,960 36 

5,752 13 

1,486 16 

50,353 39 • 

29,209 07 

167 13 

13,757 31 

527 70 

7,339 94 

2,529 41 

3,706 75 

8,358 57 

2,646 77 

4,498 83 

1,282 24 



P.D. 48 65 

Metropolitan Water Maintenance Fund — General — Concluded 

Hyde Park Station, buildings and grounds: 

Labor $557 16 

Supplies and expenses 69 50 

$626 66 

Chlorination, supplies 1,142 29 

Stock . 14,301 77 



Pumping Service: 
Superintendence: 
Labor 
Supplies and expenses 



Arlington Pumping Station: 

Labor 

Supplies and expenses .... 

Chestnut Hill Low Service Station, No. 2: 

Labor 

Supplies and expenses .... 

Chestnut Hill High Service Station, No. 1: 

Labor 

Supplies and expenses .... 

Spot Pond Pumping Station: 

Labor 

Supplies and expenses .... 



Hyde Park Pumping Station: 

Labor 

Supplies and expenses . 

13,778 79 
Booster pumping 7,507 85 



$8,050 96 
1,999 71 


$15,050 
5,597 


19 
60 


$52,398 
36,963 


14 

12 


$31,282 02 
23,209 73 


$18,459 
16,355 


57 

22 


$11,322 50 
2,456 29 



$10,050 67 
20,647 79 
89,361 26 
54,491 75 
34,814 79 



$230,239 59 



230,652 90 



$1,147 98 

Advertising 15 75 

Printing 103 13 



$2,058 74 
Engineering: 

Services 681 54 



$857,117 11 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $42,592 21 

METROPOLITAN WATER MAINTENANCE FUND — SPECIALS 

New Northern High Service Pipe Lines 

Appropriation (Chapter 138, Acts of 1927, Item 712) $15,000 00 

Expenditures 
Engineering: 

Services $5,039 46 

Supplies and expenses 595 

5,045 41 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $9,954 59 

Weston and Newton Supply Main 
Appropriation (Chapter 138, Acts of 1927, Item 713) $15,000 00 

Expenditures 
Engineering: 

Services $3,906 48 

Supplies and expenses 120 59 



4,027 07 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $10,972 93 

High Duty Engine, Arlington Pumping Station 
Appropriation (Chapter 138, Acts of 1927, Item 716) $40,000 00 

Expenditures 
Engineering: 

Services $1,147 68 

Supplies and expenses 30 



1,266 86 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $38,733 14 

Chlorination of Water Apparatus 
Appropriation (Chapter 138, Acts of 1927, Item 717) $10,000 00 

Expenditures 
Construction: 

Contract, Wallace & Tiernan, Inc $1,815 00 

Labor and materials 243 74 



2,740 28 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1927 $7,259 72 



66 P.D. 48 

Analysis of 1927 Receipts 

Credited to: 

Metropolitan Water Construction Fund $2,387 60 

Metropolitan Water Sinking Fund 129,071 23 

Metropolitan Water Maintenance Fund 7,083 83 

$138,542 66 

Bonds, Sinking Funds and Net Debt 

METROPOLITAN WATER CONSTRUCTION 
Bonds issued: 
Sinking Fund: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1927 . 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1926 . . $41,398,000 00 

$41,398,000 00 

Serial Bonds: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1927 . 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1926 . . $4,287,000 00 

4,287,000 00 

■ $45,685,000 00 

Serial bonds paid: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1927 $115,000 00 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1926 622,000 00 

— 737,000 00 

Bonds outstanding Dec. 1, 1927 $44,948,000 00 

Sinking Fund: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1927 $24,740,068 20 

Total, Dec. 1, 1926 23,571,873 99 

Increase during 1927 $1,168,194 21 

Net Debt* 

Total, Dec, 1, 1927 $20,207,931 80 

Total, Dec. 1, 1926 21,491,126 01 

Decrease during 1927 $1,283,194 21 



68 



P.D. 48 



Appendix No. 1 



Contracts made and pending during 





Contract 
Number 


WORK 


Number 

of 

Bids 


Lowest 


1 


104 


Furnish and set Bronze Lamp Posts, Brackets and Tablets for 
John W. Weeks Bridge. 


6 


$12,204 00 


2 


105 


Build Bridge over Dorchester Bay, Old Colony Parkway. 


10 


457,036 00 


3 


106 


Grading and Surfacing, Broad Canal to Lechmere Sq., 
Northern Traffic Artery. 


10 


125,574 00 


4 


107 


Surface Memorial Drive, Western Ave. to Boylston St., 
Cambridge Parkway. 


7 


12,270 00 


5 


108 


Bascule Span of the Dorchester Bay Bridge. 


3 


102,600 00 / 


6 


109 


Build Bridge and approaches over Charles River at Wales 
St. and Walnut St., Newton and Wellesley. 


9 


30,629 70 


7 


110 1 


— — 


— 


— 


8 


111 


Grading and Surfacing, Stony Brook Reservation, River St. 
to Washington St. 


7 


56,727 50 


9 


112 


Surface Memorial Drive, Western Ave. to Boylston St., 
Cambridge Parkway. 


4 


22,100 00 


10 


113 


Grading and Surfacing, Blue Hill River Rd., Hillside St. to 
West St., Milton, Quincy, Braintree. 


11 


54,171 20 


11 


114 


Repair Sea Wall at Northern Circle, Revere Beach Reserv. 


7 


3,937 50 



1 Not made up. 



P.D. 48 



69 



Appendix No. 1 



the Year 1927 — Parks Division 



Contractor 


Date 

of 

Contract 


Date 

of 

Completion 


Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 1927 


J. F. & T. F. McGann 


Feb. 17, 1927 


May 10, 1927 


$12,204 00 


Aberthaw Company ...... 

James H. Fannon ....... 


June 9, 1927 
July 14, 1927 


Nov. 14, 1927 


99,425 00 
104,411 00 


M. McDonough Co. ...... 


Rejected 


- 


- 


American Bridge Co. ...... 

C. & R. Cons. Co 


July 14, 1927 
Aug. 18, 1927 


— 


21,526 00 


Coleman Bros. ....... 


Aug. 11, 1927 


- 


64,256 00 


Simpson Bros. ........ 


July 28, 1927 


Sept. 3, 1927 


24,129 00 


James H. Fannon ....... 


Aug. 22, 1927 


- 


33,400 00 


Walsh & Co 


Sept. 22, 1927 


Dec. 2, 1927 


5,275 22 



70 



P.D. 48 



Appendix No. 2 



Num- 
ber of 
Con- 
tract 



54 » 



55 i 



56 



571 



58i 



59i 



60 1 



61 



62 



Contracts made and pending during 

[The details of Contracts made before 



2 



WORK 



Num- 
ber of 
Bids 



Furnishing and laying 30-inch 
riveted steel water pipes in 
Boston, Cambridge, Wal- 
tham and Watertown. 

Furnishing water valves: 10 
12-inch, 10 16-inch, 4 20- 
inch, 2 24-inch, 2 30-inch 
and 8 36-inch screw lift 
valves and 3 36-inch hy- 
draulic lift valves. 

Furnishing and laying 54-inch 
riveted steel water pipes in 
Boston and Brookline. 



Furnishing Chlorine Control 
Equipment for Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir. 

Furnishing 77,000 pounds cast- 
iron frames and covers for 
gate chambers. 

Furnishing 185 tons cast-iron 
water pipe: 10 tons 4-inch, 
20 tons 6-inch, 20 tons 8- 
inch, 20 tons 10-inch, 40 tons 
12-inch, 50 tons 16-inch and 
25 tons 30-inch. 

Furnishing 210 tons of cast- 
iron special castings. 



Pumping Engine for Arlington 
Pumping Station. 



Venturi Meter Tube and Meter 
Register. 



Amount op Bid 



Next to 
Lowest 



5 

Lowest 



Contractor 



14 



$101,471 00 



38,603 00 



259,630 00 



_ 3 



3.45 cents 
per pound 



31,332 00 



27,700 00 



_3 



$79,855 00 2 



27,575 00 2 



248,745 00 2 



-3 



3.375 cents 
per pound 2 



9,678 50 



29,190 00 2 



26,119 00 2 



_ 3 



C. & R. Construction Co., 
Boston. 



Feil Manufacturing Co., 
Chicago, 111. 



The Biggs Construction 
Co., Akron, Ohio. 



Wallace & Tiernan Co., 
Inc., Newark, N. J. 



Barbour Stockwell Co., 
Cambridge, Mass. 



United States Cast Iron 
Pipe & Foundry Co., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Davis & Farnum Engi- 
neering Works, Inc., 
Waltham, Mass. 

Murray Iron Works Co., 
Burlington, Iowa. 



Builders Iron Foundry, 
Providence, R. I. 



1 Contract completed. 

2 Contract based upon this bid. 

3 Competitive bids were not received. 



P.D. 48 



71 



Appendix No. 2 



the Year 1927 — Water Division 

1927 have been given in previous reports.] 



Date of 
Contract 



8 



Date of 
Completion 
of Contract 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 



10 



Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 1927 



July 20, 1926 



Sept. 16, 1926 



Mar. 10, 1927 



Jan. 14, 1927 
June 16, 1927 
June 23, 1927 



June 16, 1927 
Dec. 1, 1927 



Sept. 17, 1927 



Sept. 7, 1927 



May 24, 1927 



June 7, 1927 



Nov. 30, 1927 



Sept. 15, 1927 



Nov. 30, 1927 



See annual report for 1926 



See annual report for 1926 



For furnishing and laying 54-inch riveted steel pipe, 
$16.45 per Tin. ft.; for laying 16-inch and 12-inch 
cast-iron pipes for blow-offs, $2.50 per lin. ft.; for 
laying 6-inch cast-iron pipes for air inlets, $1.50 per 
lin. ft. ; for rock excavation above established grade, 
$6.00 per cu. yd.; for rock excavation below estab- 
lished grade, $7.00 per cu. yd.; for earth excavation 
below established grade of bottom of trench, $2.00 
per cu. yd.; for chambers for 36-inch valves, $200 
per chamber; for chambers for air valves, $90 per 
chamber; for chambers for blow-off and by-pass 
valves, $150 per chamber; for concrete masonry for 
foundations, anchorages and support for pipes, $16 
per cu. yd., for bituminous macadam resurfacing 
in streets, $2.50 per sq. yd. 

For Chlorine Control Equipment complete $1,815.00 



For furnishing cast-iron frames and covers 3.375 cents 
per pound. 



For 4-inch straight pipe, $56.10 per ton of 2,000 
pounds; for 6-inch, 8-inch, 10-inch, 12-inch, 16- 
inch and 30-inch straight pipe, $52.10 per ton of 
2,000 pounds. 



For furnishing special castings, $139.00 per ton of 
2,000 pounds. 



For pumping engine with a capacity of 3 million U. S. 
gallons in 24 hours when operated at an average 
plunger speed of not over 250 feet per minute against 
a head of 305 feet, and that when operated at said 
rate and head on the duty trial it shall perform a 
duty of 138 million foot pounds for each 1,000 
pounds of saturated steam supplied to the engine, 
$26,119. 

For 36-inch by 15-inch Venturi meter tube, $1,810; 
for special rust proof Type Y register-indicator 
recorder, $695, with 2 per cent discount. 



$90,046 51 



35,314 32 



275,175 25 



1,815 00 
2,659 20 
9,915 21 



31,064 28 



1,773 80 



72 



P.D. 48 
Contracts made and pending during 



1 


2 

WORK 


3 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids 


Amount of Bid 


6 


Num- 
ber of 
Con- 
tract 


4 

Next to 
Lowest 


5 

Lowest 


Contractor 


21-Mi 

30-M 
51-M 

Agree- 
ment 


Sale and cutting of chestnut 
and miscellaneous standing 
timber on marginal lands of 
Wachusett Reservoir. 

Rewinding stator coils of Gen- 
erator No. 4 at Wachusett 
Power Station. 

Sale and purchase of electric 
energy to be developed at 
Wachusett Dam in Clinton. 

Sale and purchase of electric en- 
ergy to be developed at Sud- 
bury Dam in Southborough. 


2 

1 

-6 


$5,000 00 2 

_5 
_6 


$9,750 003," 

_5 

$5.30 per M 

kilowatt 

hours. 

_6 


Wilder, Walker & Davis 
Co., Sterling, Mass. 

Westinghouse Electric & 
Manufacturing Co., 
Boston. 

New England Power Com- 
pany and Edison Elec- 
tric Illuminating Com- 
pany of Boston. 

Edison Electric Illuminat- 
ing Company of Boston. 



1 Contract completed. 

2 Next to highest bid. 

3 Contract based upon this bid. 



P.D. 48 

the Year 1927 — Water Division — Continued 



73 



7 

Date of 
Contract 


8 

Date of 
Completion 
of Contract 


9 

Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 


10 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 1927 


Dec. 7, 1923 

Oct. 13, 1927 
Jan. 13, 1917 

Jan. 1, 1922 


Mar. 25, 1927 


See annual report for 1923 ..... 

For rewinding stator complete, $4,592 

See annual report for 1917 ..... 

See annual report for 1922 ..... 

• 


$9,750 00 

384,137 29 
188,687 70 



* Highest bid. 

5 Competitive bids were not received. 

6 Sale of energy continued since January 1, 1922, at same price as formerly under modified extension 
of Contract 39-M. 



74 P.D. 48 

Contracts made and pending during the Year 1927 — Water Division — 

Concluded 
Summary of Contracts, 1895 to 1927, inclusive l 



Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 1927 



Distribution Section, 8 contracts 
Pumping Service, 1 contract . 



453 contracts completed from 1896 to 1926, inclusive .... 

Deduct for work done on 11 Sudbury Reservoir contracts by the city of Boston 
Total of 462 contracts ......... 



$447,763 57 



$447,763 57 
20,553,475 84 



$21,001,239 41 
512,000 00 



$20,489,239 41 



1 In this summary contracts for the 'sale of used material and contracts charged to maintenance are 
excluded. 



P.D. 48 



75 



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52.80 
59.72 
49.71 
56.44 

51.22 
48.96 
47.50 
55.24 
48.22 
45.53 
43.86 

50.84 
54.67 
50.73 


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Wachusett Watershed : 

Princeton ...... 

Jefferson ...... 

Sterling ...... 

Boylston ...... 

Sudbury Watershed: 

Sudbury Dam ..... 

Framingham ...... 

Ashland Dam ..... 

Cordaville ...... 

Lake Cochituate ..... 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir .... 

Spot Pond ...... 

Average of all 

Average, Wachusett Watershed 

Average, Sudbury Watershed 



76 P.D. 48 

Table No. 2. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 1927 



Date 


Amount 


Duration 


Date 


Amount 


Durati 


on 


Jan. 4 . 


} ' I5 


3.45 p.m. 


to 


June 4 . 


\ .62 


6.15 p.m. to 




Jan. 5 . 




1.30 A.M. 


June 5 . 




2.15 a.m. 


Jan. 10 . 


.05' 


7.00 A.M. 


to 9.00 A.M. 


June 5 . 


.15 


5.15 p.m. to 


9.30 p.m. 


Jan. 11 . 


.83' 


12.45 a.m. 


to 9.20 p.m. 


June 10 . 


1 .08 


10.00 p.m. to 




Jan. 14 . 


\ .52 


10.00 A.M. 


to 


June 11 . 




1.45 A.M. 


Jan. 15 . 


J . 




7.00 A.M. 


June 15 . 


.26 


12.30 p.m. to 


4.00 p.m. 


Jan. 15 . 


\ .51 2 


7.00 A.M. 


to 


June 19 . 


.06 


3.40 p.m. to 


5.00 p.m. 


Jan. 16 . 


f 




12.00 m. 


June 20 . 


.14 


7.00 a.m. to 


3.45 p.m. 


Jan. 20 . 


I .45 


3.45 p.m 


to 


June 23 . 


}.» 


6.30 p.m. to 




Jan. 22 . 


J 




7.00 A.M. 


June 24 . 




2.15 A.M. 


Jan. 23 . 


.12> 


3.40 p.m. 


to 11.30 p.m. 


June 26 . 


.23 


5.30 a.m. to 


6.40 p.m. 


Jan. 28 . 


\ -17 


11.30 p.m. 


to 


June 27 . 


.15 


7.30 p.m. to 


10.45 p.m. 


Jan. 29 . 


/ 




7.00 A.M. 


June 28 . 


| .33 


8.40 p.m. to 




Jan. 30 . 


.05 


11.45 a.m. 


tO 1.10 P.M. 


June 29 . 
Total . 




11.00 p.m. 


Total . 


2.85 


2.20 




Feb. 3 . 


.03 


6.00 p.m. 


to 7.30 p.m. 


July 1 . 


} .« 


10.00 p.m. to 




Feb. 6 . 


.11 ' 


3.50 a.m. 


tO 11.00 A.M. 


July 3 . 




7.30 a.m. 


Feb. 11 . 


.07' 


7.00 A.M. 


to 12.00 M. 


July 3 . 


.43 


8.20 p.m. to 


9.00 p.m. 


Feb. 13 . 


\ .87i 


9.10 p.m. 


to 


July 7 . 


\ - 41 


5.50 p.m. to 




Feb. 14 . 






10.30 p.m. 


July 8 . 


j 




2.45 a.m. 


Feb. 16 . 


.17 


5.30 p.m. 


to 11.00 P.M. 


July 10 . 


\ .32 


4.10 a.m. to 




Feb. 18 . 


.37 2 


9.45 a.m. 


to 3.30 p.m. 


July 11 . 


j 




7.00 A.M. 


Feb. 19 . 


\ 1.23 2 


1.15 A.M. 


to 


July 13 . 


.02 


6.35 p.m. to 


7.30 p.m. 


Feb. 21 . 






7.30 a.m. 


July 16 . 


1 .64 


5.15 p.m. to 




Feb. 23 . 


.08 


6.40 a.m. 


to 8.30 a.m. 


July 17'. 




6.00 A.M. 


Feb. 23 . 


.05 


10.00 p.m. 


to 11.00 P.M. 


July 17 . 


.32 


8.05 a.m. to 


9.15 A.M. 


Feb. 26 . 


.70 


12.30 a.m. 


to 7.30 A.M. 


July 18 . 


.10 


6.00 a.m. to 11. 3C 










July 22 . 


} ' 34 


11.45 p.m. to 










Total . 


3.68 






July 24 . 




1.30 A.M. 










July 27 . 
July 29 . 


72 


2.00 p.m. to 


3.30 p.m. 


Mar. 6 . 


\ .19 


6.40 p.m. 


to 


.19 


6.25 a.m. to 


7.00 A.M. 


Mar. 7 . 






6.00 A.M. 


July 29 . 


.92 


5.00 p.m. to 


6.45 p.m. 


Mar. 8 . 


.23 


2.50 a.m. 


to 12.45 p.m. 


July 31 . 


.49 


6.00 a.m. to 


9.30 p.m. 


Mar. 14 . 


.03 


4.30 p.m. 


to 5.30 p.m. 










Mar. 18 . 
Mar. 20 . 


.06 
.37' 


4.00 A.M. 

4.10 p.m. 


to 7.10 p.m. 
to 5.45 p.m. 


Total . 


5.11 














Mar. 20 . 


\ .51 


5.45 p.m. 


to 


Aug. 1 . 


\2.60 


3.15 p.m. to 




Mar. 21 . 




12.00 MIDNIGHT 


Aug. 2 . 


1 




8.00 A.M. 


Mar. 30 . 


.04 


7.30 p.m. 


to 11.30 p.m. 


Aug. 5 . 
Aug. 8 . 
Aug. 9 . 


.03 
] .50 


5.00 p.m. to 
3.45 p.m. to 


5.15 p.m. 


Total . 


1.43 






7.15 A.M. 










Aug. 9 . 
Aug. 14 . 


.07 


1.15 P.M. to 


2.00 p.m. 


Apr. 5 . 


\ 32 2 


4.10 p.m. 


to 


| .53 


8.45 p.m. to 




Apr. 6 . 






4.30 a.m. 


Aug. 15 . 


/ 




2.30 a.m. 


Apr. 22 . 


.23 


12.45 a.m. 


to 5.30 A.M. 


Aug. 18 . 


j .84 


9.30 a.m. to 




Apr. 22 . 


\ .30 


8.05 p.m. 


to 


Aug. 19 . 


/ 




9.30 a.m. 


Apr. 23 . 






4.30 a.m. 


Aug. 23 . 


\ 1.01 


4.15 a.m. to 




Apr. 25 . 


.06 


6.15 p.m. 


to 11.00 P.M. 


Aug. 24 . 


/ 




2.45 p.m. 


Apr. 26 . 


\ .10 


8.25 p.m. 


to 


Aug. 27 . 


J2.24 


4.30 A.M. to 




Apr. 27 . 


/ 




3.15 A.M. 


Aug. 29 . 


i 




5.00 A.M. 


Apr. 27 . 


I .55 


4.45 p.m. 


to 










Apr. 28 . 


J 




5.45 a.m. 


Total . 


7.82 






Total . 


1.58 


Sept. 1 . 


1.39 


7.15 a.m. to 


10.30 p.m. 










Sept. 11 . 
Sept. 15 . 


1.00 


2.00 a.m. to 


4.45 p.m. 


May 2 . 


.05 


11.45 a.m. 


to 2.45 p.m. 


.04 


3.00 A.M. to 


11.45 A.M. 


May 5 . 


.29 


12.10 a.m. 


tO 11.30 A.M. 


Sept. 19 . 


\ .28 


7.15 a.m. to 




May 6 . 


.03 


12.30 a.m. 


to 2.30 A.M. 


Sept. 20 . 




4.00 A.M. 


May 9 . 


1 -12 


11.30 A.M. 


to 










May 10 . 


j .34 


10.30 p.m. 


1.00 A.M. 

4- ^ 


Total . 


2.71 






May 10 . 


to 










May 11 . 


J 




3.30 a.m. 


Oct. 4 . 


.77 


12.10 A.M. tO 


7.30 a.m. 


May 11 . 


. 57 


4.40 p.m. 


to 5.10 p.m. 


Oct. 8 . 


.18 


2.10 A.M. tO 11.00 A.M. 


May 12 . 


\ .05 


8.00 p.m. 


to 


Oct. 9 . 


.70 


8.30 a.m. to 


8.30 p.m. 


May 13 . 


J 




9.30 a.m. 


Oct. 13 . 


1.82 


4.15 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. 


May 15 . 


1 .48 


8.00 A.M. 


to 


Oct. 17 . 


.01 


5.00 p.m. to 


5.30 p.m. 


May 16 . 


j 




10.45 p.m. 


Oct. 18 . 


} ' 47 


1.30 p.m. to 




May 17 . 


.02 


3.15 p.m. 


to 3.35 p.m. 


Oct. 19 . 




10.00 A.M. 


May 23 . 


\ .30 


11.15 A.M. 


to 


Oct. 20 . 


.14 


1.15 p.m. to 


10.00 p.m. 


May 24 . 




4.00 A.M. 














May 24 . 


.02 


10.15 A.M. 


to 2.30 p.m. 


Total . 


4.09 






May 25 . 


\ .59 


7.30 a.m. 


to 










May 26 . 




1.00 A.M. 










May 27 . 


.07 


4.45 a.m. 


to 7.00 A.M. 










May 31 . 


} - 13 


11.10 P.M. 


to 










June 1 . 




1.15 A.M. 










Total . 


3.06 





1 Snow. 



2 Rain and snow. 



P.D. 48 77 

Table No. 2 — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 1927 — Concluded 



Date 


Amount 


Duration 


Date 


Amount 


Duration 


Nov. 3 . 


2.24 


1.15 a.m. to 


7.15 A.M. 


Dec. 2 . 


\ .99 


12.30 p.m. to 


Nov. 3 . 


\ .07 


7.10 p.m. to 




Dec. 3 . 


J 


12.45 a.m. 


Nov. 4 . 




11.15 A.M. 


Dec. 4 . 


1 .95' 


3.30 p.m. to 


Nov. 7 . 


.02i 


4.00 a.m. to 


6.00 A.M. 


Dec. 5 . 


j 


2.00 p.m. 


Nov. 11 . 


.07 


12.15 a.m. to 


7.45 a.m. 


Dec. 8 . 


.83 


3.20 a.m. to 11.15 a.m. 


Nov. 17 . 


\ 1.92 


7.45 p.m. to 




Dec. 11 . 


.25 


3.45 p.m. to 11.15 p.m. 


Nov. 18 . 


\ 




11.30 A.M. 


Dec. 13 . 


\ .85 


6.00 a.m. to 


Nov. 24 . 


\ .70 


1.00 p.m. to 




Dec. 14 . 


J 


9.00 A.M. 


Nov. 25 . 


J 




7.30 a.m 


Dec. 16 . 


I 1.05 


5.30 a.m. to 


Nov. 27 . 


.25 


12.10 A.M. tO 


5.00 p.m. 


Dec. 17 . 


J 


12.30 a.m. 


Nov. 28 . 


\ .24 


6.00 p.m. to 




Dec. 29 . 


.40 


4.45 a.m. to 5.00 p.m. 


Nov. 29 . 


1 




7.15 A.M. 


Dec. 31 . 


}.17 


11.45 a.m. to 










Jan. 1 . 


3.45 a.m. 






Total . 


5.51 






















* 


Total . 


5.49 





Total for year, 45.53 inches. 
1 Snow. 




78 



P.D. 48 



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P.D. 48 81 

Table No. 6. — Sources from which and Periods during which Water has been 
drawn for the Supply of the Metropolitan Water District 

From Wachusett Reservoir into the Wachusett Aqueduct 





Number of 
Days during 


Actual Time 


Million 


Month 


which 
Water was 




Gallons 








Drawn 




Flowing 


Hours 


Minutes 




January ....... 


25 


265 


45 


2,468 . 1 


February 
















23 


231 





2,696.2 


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27 


275 





2,203.9 


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25 


307 





4,524.9 


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25 


265 


45 


3,366.6 


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26 


264 





3,903.9 


July . 
















25 


274 


15 


3,883.6 


August 
















27 


275 





2,986.5 


September 
















22 


225 


30 


2,330.6 


October 
















25 


247 


30 


2,329.7 


November 
















3 


33 





376.0 


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21 


220 





1,293.3 


Totals 
















274 


120.16 days 


32,363.3 



From Sudbury Reservoir through the Weston Aqueduct to Weston Reservoir 





Number of 
Days during 


Actual Time 


Million 


Month 


which 
Water was 




Gallons 








Drawn 




Flowing 


Hours 


Minutes 




January ....... 


31 


654 


31 


3,105.8 


February 
















28 


593 





2,830.2 


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31 


661 


45 


3,120.8 


April . 
















30 


649 


56 


2,998.6 


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31 


652 


50 


3,048.9 


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30 


628 





3,008.7 


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31 


645 


21 


3,076.1 


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31 


630 


57 


3,140.9 


September 
















30 


615 


37 


3,083.9 


October 
















31 


633 


07 


3,187.9 


November 
















30 


604 


55 


3,114.2 


December 
















31 


632 


47 


3,242.1 


Totals 
















365 


316.78 days 


36,958.1 



From Framingham Reservoir No. 8 through the Sudbury Aqueduct to Chestnut 

Hill Reservoir 








Number of 






Month 


Days during 
which 


Actual Time 
(Hours) 


Million 
Gallons 




Water was 


Drawn 




Flowing 






January ......... 


31 


744 


793.4 


February 




















28 


672 


794.7 


March 




















31 


744 


797.4 


April 




















30 


719i 


786.9 


May 




















31 


744 


785.7 


June 




















30 


720 


948.1 


July 




















31 


744 


778.1 


August 




















31 


744 


513.9 


September 




















30 


721i 


559.6 


October . 




















31 


744 


562.4 


November 




















30 


720 


370.1 


December 




















31 


744 


440.7 


Totals 




















365 


365 days 


8,131.0 



1 Change for daylight saving time. 



82 



Table No. 7. 



P.D. 48 

Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through Aqueducts in 
1927 by Months 1 





Wachusett 


Weston 


Sudbury 


Cochituate 




Aqueduct 


Aqueduct 


Aqueduct 


Aqueduct 




into 


into 


into 


into 


Month 


Sudbury 


Metropolitan 


Chestnut Hill 


Chestnut Hill 




Reservoir 


District 


Reservoir 


Reservoir 




(Gallons) 


(Gallons) 


(Gallons) 


(Gallons) 


January ...... 


79,393,000 


100,187,000 


25,593,000 


6,861,000 


February 














96,061,000 


101,078,000 


28,382,000 


— 


March . 














70,855,000 


100,671,000 


25,722,000 


— 


April 














150,800,000 


100,093,000 


26,266,000 


— 


May 














108,348,000 


98,352,000 


25,345,000 


— 


June 














129,897,000 


100,290,000 


31,603,000 


1,803,000 


July 














125,023,000 


99,229,000 


25,100,000 


9,090.000 


August . 














96,081,000 


101,319,000 


16,578,000 


11,471,000 


September 














77,299,000 


102,654,000 


18,628,000 


12,136,000 


October 














74,871,000 


102,835,000 


18,142,000 


12,835,000 


November 














12,273,000 


103,807,000 


12,337,000 


13,023,000 


December 














41,458,000 


104,584,000 


14,216,000 


13,197,000 


Average 














88,416,000 


101,255,000 


22,277,000 


6,753,000 



i Not 



including quantities wasted while cleaning and repairing aqueducts. 






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90 

Table No. 



P.D. 48 

15. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in Boston. 

1898-1927. 

[Parts per 100,000.] 











Color 


Residue on 
Evaporation 


Ammonia 


a 

a 

g 

jo 


-d 
S 

3 

§ 

o 
O 
a 
a 
>> 

o 






Platinum 

Standard 


"3 

■is 

o 
H 


Loss on 

Ignition 


S 

ft 


ALBUMINOID 




Year 


"e3 
O 


03 


3 

i 

a 

En 

3 
W 


u 

a 

-3 

c 

a 


1898 


.40 


4.19 


1.60 


.0008 


.0152 


.0136 


.0016 


.29 


.44 


1.4 


1899 








.28 


3.70 


1.30 


.0006 


.0136 


.0122 


.0014 


.24 


.35 


1.1 


1900 








.29 


3.80 


1.20 


.0012 


.0157 


.0139 


.0018 


.25 


.38 


1.3 


1901 








.29 


4.43 


1.64 


.0013 


.0158 


.0142 


.0016 


.30 


.42 


1.7 


1902 








.30 


3.93 


1.56 


.0016 


.0139 


.0119 


.0020 


.29 


.40 


1.3 


1903 








.29 


3.98 


1.50 


.0013 


.0125 


.0110 


.0015 


.30 


.39 


1.5 


1904 








.23 


3.93 


1.59 


.0023 


.0139 


.0121 


.0018 


.34 


.37 


1.5 


1905 








.24 


3.86 


1.59 


.0020 


.0145 


.0124 


.0021 


.35 


.35 


1.4 


1906 








.24 


3.86 


1.39 


.0018 


.0159 


.0134 


.0025 


.34 


.36 


1.3 


1907 








.22 


3.83 


1.40 


.0013 


.0129 


.0109 


.0020 


.33 


.32 


1.3 


1908 








.19 


3.50 


1.35 


.0011 


.0115 


.0092 


.0024 


.33 


.26 


1.2 


1909 








.18 


3.46 


1.43 


.0011 


.0128 


.0103 


.0025 


.28 


.25 


1.3 


1910 








.14 


3.05 


1.24 


.0013 


.0118 


.0102 


.0016 


.28 


.22 


1.1 


1911 








.25 


4.18 


1.66 


.0015 


.0156 


.0128 


.0029 


.38 


.33 


1.4 


1912 








.17 


3.86 


1.23 


.0018 


.0154 


.0119 


.0034 


.36 


.29 


1.7 


1913 








.13 


3.96 


1.15 


.0014 


.0150 


.0120 


.0026 


.35 


.26 


1.5 


1914 








.14 


4.12 


1.19 


.0014 


.0138 


.0116 


.0022 


.39 


.25 


1.4 


1915 








.16 


3.73 


1.04 


.0015 


.0157 


.0134 


.0023 


.38 


.25 


1.4 


1916 








.18 


4.53 


1.85 


.0013 


.0133 


.0107 


.0026 


.36 


— 


1.4 


1917 








.15 


4.45 


1.68 


.0015 


.0142 


.0124 


.0018 


.33 


— 


1.3 


1918 








.18 


3.89 


1.45 


.0019 


.0154 


.0128 


.0026 


.29 


— 


1.4 


1919 








.20 


4.28 


1.41 


.0010 


.0130 


.0108 


.0022 


.36 


— 


1.5 


1920 








.17 


4.23 


1.35 


.0012 


.0112 


.0097 


.0014 


.33 


— 


1.5 


1921 








.13 


3.80 


1.39 


.0006 


.0104 


.0089 


.0015 


.25 


— 


1.4 


1922 








.16 


3.98 


1.55 


.0011 


.0097 


.0080 


.0017 


.30 


— 


1.8 


1923 








.15 


3.90 


1.45 


.0011 


.0100 


.0090 


.0010 


.26 


— 


1.5 


1924 








.12 


4.10 


1.60 


.0011 


.0109 


.0084 


.0025 


.28 


— 


1.5 


1925 








.09 


3.98 


1.62 


.0013 


.0109 


.0093 


.0016 


.29 


— 


1.5 


1926 








.10 


4.18 


1.68 


.0015 


.0115 


.0092 


.0023 


.32 


— 


1.5 


1927 








.22 


4.47 


1.62 


.0013 


.0111 


.0101 


.0018 


.34 


— 


1.9 



Table No. 16. — Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimeter in Water from Various 
Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works, 1898-1927. {Averages of Weekly 
Determinations.) 













Chest* 


ruT Hill Reservoir 


Southern Service Taps 


Year 


Sudbury 
Aqueduct 
Terminal 
Chamber 


Cochituate 
Aqueduct 


Effluent 

Gate-house 

No. 2 


4 

Low Service, 

180 Boylston 

Street 


High Service, 

1 Ashburton 

Place 


1898 


207 


145 


111 


96 


— 


1899 










224 


104 


217 


117 


123 


1900 










248 


113 


256 


188 


181 


1901 










225 


149 


169 


162 


168 


1902 










203 


168 


121 


164 


246 


1903 










76 


120 


96 


126 


243 


1904 










347 


172 


220 


176 


355 


1905 










495. 


396 


489 


231 


442 


1906 










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145 


246 


154 


261 


1907 










147 


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118 


130 


176 


1908 










162 


138 


137 


136 


148 


1909 










198 


229 


119 


150 


195 


1910 










216 


- 


180 


178 


213 


1911 










205 


204 


151 


175 


197 


1912 










429 


450 


227 


249 


259 


1913 










123 


243 


157 


119 


140 


1914 










288 


— 


252 


174 


220 


1915 










163 


— 


128 


117 


134 


1916 










128 


— 


85 


102 


105 


1917 










178 


112 


119 


119 


141 


1918 










1,163 


168 


705 


317 


544 


1919 










92 


85 


100 


70 


84 


1920 










148 


86 


108 


113 


112 


1921 










103 


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83 


92 


92 


1922 










163 


— 


153 


160 


172 


1923 










229 


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178 


217 


230 


1924 










137 


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96 


150 


160 


1925 










144 


251 


120 


155 


174 


1926 










167 


— 


118 


130 


137 


1927 










119 


185 


70 


81 


101 



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96 



P.D. 48 



Table No. 22. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters, Per Cent of Services Metered, Fire 
Services and Fire Hydrants in the Several Cities and Towns in the Metropolitan 
Water District December 31, 1927 











Services 










Per Cent 


Used for 


Fire 

TT 1 j. 


City on Town 


Services 


Meters 


of Services 


Fire 








Metered 


Purposes 
Only 


Hydrants 


Arlington ...... 


5,837 


5,837 


100.00 


29 


714 


Belmont . 












3,480 


3,480 


100.00 


7 


402 


Boston 












95,771 


93,854 


98.00 


2,968 


11,435 


Chelsea 












5,674 


5,674 


100.00 


126 


430 


Everett 












6,836 


6,836 


100.00 


42 


588 


Lexington 












2,169 


2,169 


100.00 


13 


329 


Maiden 












9,235 


9,177 


99.37 


75 


686 


Medford . 












9,407 


9,407 


100.00 


25 


907 


Melrose 












5,336 


5,336 


100.00 


23 


429 


Milton 












3,535 


3,535 


100.00 


3 


541 


Nahant 












860 


854 


99.30 


2 


122 


Quincy 












15,347 


14,802 


96.45 


26 


1,580 


Revere 












6,141 


5,714 


93.05 


7 


423 


Somerville 












14,008 


13,857 


98.92 


98 


1,336 


Stoneham 












2,125 


2,125 


100.00 


3 


160 


Swampscott 












2,488 


2,488 


100.00 


9 


262 


Watertown 












5,582 


5,582 


100.00 


36 


580 


Winthrop . 












3,481 


3,481 


100.00 


5 


358 


District Supplied 


197,312 


194,208 


98.43 


3,497 


21,282 


Brookline . 










7,244 


7,244 


100.00 


25 


870 


Newton 










13,556 


13,556 


100.00 


65 


1,355 


Total Distri 


st 










218,112 


215,008 


98.58 


3,587 


23,507 



P.D. 48 



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Appendix No. 4 



Contracts made and pending during 

Contracts relating to the 



Number 

of 
Contract 



23i 



24i 



25i 



26i 



27 



28 



Work 



Section 80, Mill Brook Val- 
ley Sewer, North Metro- 
politan System, in Arling- 
ton. 

Section 81, Belmont Relief 
Sewer, North Metropoli- 
tan System, in Cambridge 
and Belmont. 

Furnishing and placing two 
horizontal boilers at the 
Charlestown Pumping 
Station. 

Furnishing and setting two 
horizontal boilers at the 
Deer Island Pumping 
Station. 



Furnishing engine and cen- 
trifugal pump for Alewife 
Brook Pumping Station. 

Furnishing and installing a 
new economizer at the 
Charlestown Pumping 
Station. 



Number 

of 

Bids 



11 



Amount of Bid 



Next to 
Lowest 



5 

Lowest 



$32,915 00 


63,537 


00 


2,248 


00 


8,326 


00 


No 


bid 


2,303 


00 



$29,575 00 2 



63,491 50 2 



2,215 00 2 



8,075 00 2 



4,090 00 2 



2,100 00 



Contractor 



Antony Cefalo, West 
Roxbury. 



J. H. Ferguson Co., 
Providence, R. I. 



International Engineer- 
ing Works, Inc., 
Framingham, Mass. 



D. W. Dillon Steam 
Boiler Works, Fitch- 
burg, Mass. 



Starkweather & Broad- 
hurst, Inc., Boston, 
Mass. 

The Green Fuel Econo- 
mizer Co., Boston, 
Mass. 



i Contract completed. 



P.D. 48 



101 



Appendix No. 4 



the Year 1927 — Sewerage Division 
North Metropolitan System 



Date of 
Contract 



8 



Date of 

Completion 

of Work 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts made 
in 1927 



10 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1927 



Aug. 


23, 


1926 


Dec. 


30, 


1926 


April 


28, 


1927 


May 


12, 


1927 


May 


5, 


1927 


Sept. 


13, 


1927 



April 13, 1927 



Oct. 6, 1927 



June 9, 1927 



Sept. 15, 1927 



For furnishing all material and constructing and erect- 
ing, ready for connection, two 60-inch horizontal 
tubular boilers. 



For removing two existing 60-inch horizontal tubular 
boilers and setting, and furnishing all material and 
constructing and erecting, ready for connection, 
including brick setting with all appurtenances, cast- 
iron fronts, water columns and grates, two 72-inch 
horizontal tubular boilers. 

For constructing and furnishing f.o.b. West Medford, 
Mass., complete for erection a pumping unit con- 
sisting of an engine and centrifugal pump. 

For furnishing and erecting a 96 tube, 16 section, 
Green Fuel Economizer on foundations now in place. 



$29,249 


23 


68,416 


93 


2,215 


00 


8,075 00 


3,067 


50 


1,050 00 



2 Contract based upon this bid. 



Contracts made and pending during the Year 1927 

— Concluded 
Summary of Contracts 



Sewerage Division 



Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 1927 



North Metropolitan System, 6 Contracts 



$112,073 66 



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